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Tracing Mobile Inventors – The Causality between Inventor Mobility and Inventor Productivity

  • Hoisl, Karin

This paper analyzes the causality between inventor productivity and inventor mobility. The results show that the level of education has no influence on inventor productivity. Making use of external sources of knowledge, on the contrary, has a significant effect on productivity. Finally, firm size has a positive impact on productivity. Firm size also influences inventor mobility, although negatively. Whereas existing research implicitly assumes causality to point in one direction, this study ex-ante allows for a simultaneous relationship. To deal with the expected endogeneity problem, instrumental variables techniques will be employed. Results show that mobile inventors are more than four times as productive as non-movers. Whereas mobility increases productivity, an increase in productivity decreases the number of moves.

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Paper provided by University of Munich, Munich School of Management in its series Discussion Papers in Business Administration with number 1260.

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Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:lmu:msmdpa:1260
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  8. Andrew Clark & Yannis Georgellis & Peter Sanfey, 1997. "Job Satisfaction, Wage Changes and Quits: Evidence from Germany," Studies in Economics 9711, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  9. Sangjoon Lee & Jinyoung Kim, 2004. "Research Scientist Productivity and Firm Size: Evidence from Panel Data on Inventors," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 465, Econometric Society.
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  12. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-90, October.
  13. Hans Gersbach & Armin Schmutzler, 2003. "Endogenous Technological Spillovers: Causes and Consequences," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(2), pages 179-205, 06.
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