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Do capital market and trade liberalization trigger labor market deregulation ?

Previous analyses showed that product market deregulation often precedes labor market (LM) reforms. This paper introduces LM imperfections within an economic geography framework, the level of optimal LM regulation being based on each country's social preferences. Due to capital mobility, opening the economy to a country with a deregulated LM puts pressure on LM institutions. As the fall in trade costs increases the intensity of the agglomeration force, LM regulation loses in efficiency. The threat of relocation drives changes in LM policy, with suggests that the effect of liberalization might be found primarily in the weakening of employment protection, resulting in minimal actual relocations.

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File URL: ftp://mse.univ-paris1.fr/pub/mse/cahiers2006/Bla06062.pdf
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Paper provided by Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1) in its series Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques with number bla06062.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mse:wpsorb:bla06062
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