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Human Capital Diversity and Product Innovation: A Micro-Level Analysis

Author

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  • Rene Söllner

    () (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, DFG-RTG "The Economics of Innovative Change")

Abstract

The paper investigates the relationship between human capital diversity measured in terms of occupational diversity and a firm's likelihood to innovate. The empirical analysis is based on a linked employer-employee panel dataset of German firms over the period 1998 to 2007. Despite notable differences between service and manufacturing firms, our results clearly indicate a positive relationship between occupational diversity and the propensity to innovate.

Suggested Citation

  • Rene Söllner, 2010. "Human Capital Diversity and Product Innovation: A Micro-Level Analysis," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-027, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2010-027
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    File URL: http://pubdb.wiwi.uni-jena.de/pdf/wp_2010_027.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Storz, Cornelia & Riboldazzi, Federico & John, Moritz, 2015. "Mobility and innovation: A cross-country comparison in the video games industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 121-137.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Capital; Diversity; Innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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