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Does immigration boost per capita income?

Author

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  • Felbermayr, Gabriel
  • Hiller, Sanne
  • Sala, Davide

Abstract

Using a cross-section of countries, we adapt Frankel and Romer’s (1999) IV strategy to international labor mobility. Controlling for institutional quality, trade, and financial openness, we establish a robust and non-negative causal effect of immigration on real per capita income.

Suggested Citation

  • Felbermayr, Gabriel & Hiller, Sanne & Sala, Davide, 2010. "Does immigration boost per capita income?," Munich Reprints in Economics 20582, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:20582
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alesina, Alberto & Devleeschauwer, Arnaud & Easterly, William & Kurlat, Sergio & Wacziarg, Romain, 2003. "Fractionalization," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 155-194, June.
    2. Buch, Claudia M. & Toubal, Farid, 2009. "Openness and growth: The long shadow of the Berlin Wall," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 409-422, September.
    3. Rose, Andrew K. & Spiegel, Mark M., 2009. "International financial remoteness and macroeconomic volatility," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 250-257, July.
    4. Lewer, Joshua J. & Van den Berg, Hendrik, 2008. "A gravity model of immigration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 164-167, April.
    5. Edward L. Glaeser & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "Do Institutions Cause Growth?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 271-303, September.
    6. George J. Borjas, 1995. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
    7. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Cristian Pop-Eleches & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "Judicial Checks and Balances," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(2), pages 445-470, April.
    8. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, June.
    9. Gabriel Felbermayr & Wilhelm Kohler, 2014. "Can International Migration Ever Be Made a Pareto Improvement?," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: European Economic Integration, WTO Membership, Immigration and Offshoring, chapter 11, pages 373-393 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    10. Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri, 2016. "Rethinking The Effect Of Immigration On Wages," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 2, pages 35-80 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    11. J. M. C. Santos Silva & Silvana Tenreyro, 2006. "The Log of Gravity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 641-658, November.
    12. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
    13. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2003. "Institutions Don't Rule: Direct Effects of Geography on Per Capita Income," NBER Working Papers 9490, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Noguer, Marta & Siscart, Marc, 2005. "Trade raises income: a precise and robust result," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 447-460, March.
    16. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Alesina & Johann Harnoss & Hillel Rapoport, 2016. "Birthplace diversity and economic prosperity," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 101-138, June.
    2. Torben Schmidt & Peter Jensen, 2013. "Foreign labor and regional labor markets: aggregate and disaggregate impact on growth and wages in Danish regions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(3), pages 809-840, June.
    3. Emmanuel Letouzé & Mark Purser & Francisco Rodríguez & Matthew Cummins, 2009. "Revisiting the Migration-Development Nexus: A Gravity Model Approach," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2009-44, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), revised Oct 2009.
    4. Gianluca Orefice, 2010. "Skilled Migration and Economic Performances: Evidence from OECD Countries," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 146(IV), pages 781-820, December.
    5. Ekrame Boubtane & Jean-Christophe Dumont & Christophe Rault, 2016. "Immigration and economic growth in the OECD countries 1986–2006," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 340-360.
    6. Heid, Benedikt & Larch, Mario, 2012. "Migration, trade and unemployment," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 6, pages 1-40.
    7. Sanne Hiller, 2013. "Does immigrant employment matter for export sales? Evidence from Denmark," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(2), pages 369-394, June.
    8. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    9. Potrafke, Niklas, 2013. "Globalization and labor market institutions: International empirical evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 829-842.
    10. Martin Kahanec & Mariola Pytliková, 2017. "The economic impact of east–west migration on the European Union," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 44(3), pages 407-434, August.
    11. Muysken, Joan & Ziesemer, Thomas, 2011. "Immigration and growth in an ageing economy - version 2," MERIT Working Papers 037, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    12. Alamá-Sabater, Luisa & Heid, Benedikt & Jiménez-Fernández, Eduardo & Márquez-Ramos, Laura, 2016. "What drives interdependence of FDI among host countries? The role of geographic proximity and similarity in public debt," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 466-474.
    13. Stanislav Cernosa, 2011. "Openness to Trade, Migration and Foreign Direct Investments of the EU," WIFO Working Papers 401, WIFO.
    14. Nico Stöckmann, 2017. ""The Impact of Refugees on Per Capita Income" A Gravity Model Approach," Working Papers CIE 99, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
    15. Okyay UCAN & F.Merve PARLAKYILDIZ & M.Basaran OZTURK, 2014. "An Empirical Test of Income Distribution and Migration Relationship: A Case of Turkey," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(3), pages 355-360, March.
    16. Peter Eppinger & Niklas Potrafke, 2016. "Did Globalisation Influence Credit Market Deregulation?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(3), pages 426-443, March.
    17. Hiller, Sanne, 2011. "Does Immigrant Employment Matter for Exports? Evidence From Denmark," Working Papers 11-16, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    18. Bahar, Dany & Hillel Rapoport, 2013. "Migration, knowledge diffusion and the comparative advantage of nations," Working Paper 97706, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    19. repec:aes:amfeco:v:46:y:2017:i:19:p:757 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation

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