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A Mixture Innovation Heterogeneous Autoregressive Model for Structural Breaks and Long Memory

  • Nima Nonejad

    ()

    (Aarhus University and CREATES)

Registered author(s):

    We propose a flexible model to describe nonlinearities and long-range dependence in time series dynamics. Our model is an extension of the heterogeneous autoregressive model. Structural breaks occur through mixture distributions in state innovations of linear Gaussian state space models. Monte Carlo simulations evaluate the properties of the estimation procedures. Results show that the proposed model is viable and flexible for purposes of forecasting volatility. Model uncertainty is accounted for by employing Bayesian model averaging. Bayesian model averaging provides very competitive forecasts compared to any single model specification. It provides further improvements when we average over nonlinear specifications.

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    File URL: ftp://ftp.econ.au.dk/creates/rp/13/rp13_24.pdf
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    Paper provided by School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus in its series CREATES Research Papers with number 2013-24.

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    Length: 24
    Date of creation: 08 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:aah:create:2013-24
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.au.dk/afn/

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    1. Neil Shephard & Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen, 2002. "Estimating quadratic variation using realised variance," Economics Series Working Papers 2001-W20, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Groen, J.J.J. & Paap, R., 2009. "Real-time inflation forecasting in a changing world," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2009-19, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    3. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Pettenuzzo, Davide & Timmermann, Allan, 2004. "Forecasting Time Series Subject to Multiple Structural Breaks," IZA Discussion Papers 1196, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Chun Liu & John M Maheu, 2007. "Are there Structural Breaks in Realized Volatility?," Working Papers tecipa-304, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    5. Anderson, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Diebold, Francis X. & Labys, Paul, 2002. "Modeling and Forecasting Realized Volatility," Working Papers 02-12, Duke University, Department of Economics.
    6. Jana Eklund & Sune Karlsson, 2007. "Forecast Combination and Model Averaging Using Predictive Measures," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2-4), pages 329-363.
    7. Chun Liu & John M. Maheu, 2009. "Forecasting realized volatility: a Bayesian model-averaging approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(5), pages 709-733.
    8. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Shephard, 2002. "Econometric analysis of realized volatility and its use in estimating stochastic volatility models," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 64(2), pages 253-280.
    9. Koopman, Siem Jan & Jungbacker, Borus & Hol, Eugenie, 2005. "Forecasting daily variability of the S&P 100 stock index using historical, realised and implied volatility measurements," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 445-475, June.
    10. Michael McAller & Marcelo C. Medeiros, 2007. "A multiple regime smooth transition heterogeneous autoregressive model for long memory and asymmetries," Textos para discussão 544, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    11. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold, 2007. "Roughing It Up: Including Jump Components in the Measurement, Modeling, and Forecasting of Return Volatility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(4), pages 701-720, November.
    12. Lars Forsberg & Eric Ghysels, 2007. "Why Do Absolute Returns Predict Volatility So Well?," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 5(1), pages 31-67.
    13. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2003. "Power and bipower variation with stochastic volatility and jumps," Economics Papers 2003-W17, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    14. Francis X. Diebold & Robert S. Mariano, 1994. "Comparing Predictive Accuracy," NBER Technical Working Papers 0169, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. O. E. Barndorff-Nielsen & P. Reinhard Hansen & A. Lunde & N. Shephard, 2009. "Realized kernels in practice: trades and quotes," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 12(3), pages C1-C32, November.
    16. Fulvio Corsi, 2009. "A Simple Approximate Long-Memory Model of Realized Volatility," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 7(2), pages 174-196, Spring.
    17. J. Durbin, 2002. "A simple and efficient simulation smoother for state space time series analysis," Biometrika, Biometrika Trust, vol. 89(3), pages 603-616, August.
    18. Xin Huang & George Tauchen, 2005. "The Relative Contribution of Jumps to Total Price Variance," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 3(4), pages 456-499.
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