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William M. Hynes

Personal Details

First Name:William
Middle Name:M.
Last Name:Hynes
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phy12

Affiliation

(90%) Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Économiques (OCDE)

Paris, France
http://www.oecd.org/

: 33-(0)-1-45 24 82 00
33-(0)-1-45 24 85 00
2 rue Andre Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16
RePEc:edi:oecddfr (more details at EDIRC)

(10%) International Economics Department
School of Advanced International Studies
Johns Hopkins University

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
https://www.sais-jhu.edu/content/international-economics

: 202.663.5684
202.663.7718
1740 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. Room N413, Washington, DC 20036
RePEc:edi:iejhuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Frans Lammersen & William Hynes, 2016. "Aid for Trade and the Sustainable Development Agenda: Strengthening Synergies," OECD Development Policy Papers 5, OECD Publishing.
  2. William Hynes & Alexandra Trzeciak-Duval, 2014. "The Donor that came in from the cold: OECD-Russian engagement on development co-operation," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp450, IIIS.
  3. William Hynes & Peter Carroll, 2013. "Engaging with Arab aid donors: the DAC experience," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp424, IIIS.
  4. William Hynes & Simon Scott, 2013. "The Evolution of Official Development Assistance: Achievements, Criticisms and a Way Forward," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp437, IIIS.
  5. William Hynes & Patrick Holden, 2012. "What future for the Global Aid for Trade Initiative? Towards a fairer assessment of its achievements and limitations," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp421, IIIS.
  6. Hynes, William & Jacks, David S. & O'Rourke, Kevin Hjortshøj, 2009. "Commodity Market Disintegration in the Interwar Period," CEPR Discussion Papers 7189, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

Articles

  1. William Hynes & Patrick Holden, 2016. "What future for the Global Aid for Trade Initiative? Towards an assessment of its achievements and limitations," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(4), pages 593-619, July.
  2. William Hynes, 2014. "To what extent were economic factors important in the separation of the south of Ireland from the United Kingdom and what was the economic impact?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 369-397.
  3. William Hynes & David S. Jacks & Kevin H. O'rourke, 2012. "Commodity market disintegration in the interwar period," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 119-143, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. William Hynes & Alexandra Trzeciak-Duval, 2014. "The Donor that came in from the cold: OECD-Russian engagement on development co-operation," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp450, IIIS.

    Cited by:

    1. Alina A. Shenfeldt, 2016. "Anti-Corruption Compliance of Development Assistance Donor Organisations: The Case of Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 28/IR/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

  2. William Hynes & Peter Carroll, 2013. "Engaging with Arab aid donors: the DAC experience," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp424, IIIS.

    Cited by:

    1. Joren Verschaeve & Jan Orbie, 2016. "The DAC is Dead, Long Live the DCF? A Comparative Analysis of the OECD Development Assistance Committee and the UN Development Cooperation Forum," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(4), pages 571-587, September.
    2. Bracho, Gerardo, 2015. "In search of a narrative for Southern providers: the challenge of the emerging economies to the development cooperation agenda," Discussion Papers 1/2015, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
    3. William Hynes & Alexandra Trzeciak-Duval, 2014. "The Donor that came in from the cold: OECD-Russian engagement on development co-operation," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp450, IIIS.

  3. William Hynes & Simon Scott, 2013. "The Evolution of Official Development Assistance: Achievements, Criticisms and a Way Forward," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp437, IIIS.

    Cited by:

    1. Joren Verschaeve & Jan Orbie, 2018. "Ignoring the elephant in the room? Assessing the impact of the European Union on the Development Assistance Committee's role in international development," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 36(S1), pages 44-58, March.
    2. Justin Yifu LIN & Yan WANG, 2015. "China’s Contribution to Development Cooperation: Ideas, Opportunities and Finances," Working Papers P119, FERDI.
    3. Cassimon, Danny & Renard, Robrecht & Verbeke, Karel, 2014. "How to account for concessional loans in aid statistics?," IOB Analyses & Policy Briefs 9, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy (IOB).
    4. Domínguez, Rafael & Olivié, Iliana, 2014. "Retos para la cooperación al desarrollo en el post-2015 /Challenges for Development Cooperation in the Post-2015," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 32, pages 995-1020, Septiembr.
    5. Joseph Onjala, 2018. "China's development loans and the threat of debt crisis in Kenya," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 36(S2), pages 710-728, September.

  4. William Hynes & Patrick Holden, 2012. "What future for the Global Aid for Trade Initiative? Towards a fairer assessment of its achievements and limitations," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp421, IIIS.

    Cited by:

    1. Beata Udvari, 2016. "The Aid for Trade initiative and the export performance of the Iberian EU-countries," IWE Working Papers 225, Institute for World Economics - Centre for Economic and Regional Studies- Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  5. Hynes, William & Jacks, David S. & O'Rourke, Kevin Hjortshøj, 2009. "Commodity Market Disintegration in the Interwar Period," CEPR Discussion Papers 7189, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. David S. Jacks & Se Yan & Liuyan Zhao, 2016. "Silver Points, Silver Flows, and the Measure of Chinese Financial Integration," NBER Working Papers 22747, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. O’Rourke, Kevin Hjortshøj, 2019. "Economic History and Contemporary Challenges to Globalization," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 79(02), pages 356-382, June.
    3. Raúl Serrano & Vicente Pinilla, 2013. "New directions of trade for the agri-food industry: a disaggregated approach for different income countries, 1963-2000," Documentos de Trabajo dt2013-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    4. David S. Jacks & Christopher M. Meissner & Dennis Novy, 2009. "Trade Booms, Trade Busts, and Trade Costs," NBER Working Papers 15267, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. O'Rourke, Kevin Hjortsh�j, 2017. "Two Great Trade Collapses: The Interwar Period & Great Recession Compared," CEPR Discussion Papers 12286, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Giovanni Federico, 2011. "A Tale of Two Oceans: Market Integration Over the High Seas, 1800-1940," Working Papers 0011, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    7. Miguel Tinoco-Zermeño & Francisco Venegas-Martínez & Víctor Torres-Preciado, 2014. "Growth, bank credit, and inflation in Mexico: evidence from an ARDL-bounds testing approach," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 23(1), pages 1-22, December.
    8. Chris Hajzler & James MacGee, 2015. "Retail Price Differences Across U.S. and Canadian Cities During the Interwar Period," University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute Working Papers 20153, University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute.
    9. Richard S. Grossman & Christopher M. Meissner, 2010. "International Aspects of the Great Depression and the Crisis of 2007: Similarities, Differences, and Lessons," NBER Working Papers 16269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Kevin Hjortshøj O’Rourke, 2018. "Two Great Trade Collapses: The Interwar Period and Great Recession Compared," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 66(3), pages 418-439, September.
    11. Vicente Pinilla & Gema Aparicio, 2014. "Navigating in Troubled Waters: South American Exports of Food and Agricultural Products in the World Market, 1900-1938," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1406, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    12. Chilosi, David & Federico, Giovanni, 2015. "Early globalizations: the integration of Asia in the world economy, 1800–1938," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64785, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. Fleissig, Adrian R. & Whitney, Gerald A., 2015. "Belgium relief fund, post war food shortages and the “True” cost of living," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 93-106.
    14. David S. Jacks, 2011. "Defying Gravity: The 1932 Imperial Economic Conference and the Reorientation of Canadian Trade," NBER Working Papers 17242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Adam, Marc Christopher, 2019. "Return of the tariffs: The interwar trade collapse revisited," Discussion Papers 2019/8, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    16. Jonathan A. Batten & Peter G. Szilagyi & Wagner, 2015. "Should emerging market investors buy commodities?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(39), pages 4228-4246, August.
    17. Brunt, Liam & Cannon, Edmund, 2013. "Integration in the English wheat market 1770-1820," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 12/2013, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    18. Kym Anderson, 2016. "Agricultural Trade, Policy Reforms, and Global Food Security," Palgrave Studies in Agricultural Economics and Food Policy, Palgrave Macmillan, number 978-1-137-46925-0, September.
    19. Jacks, David S., 2014. "Defying gravity: The Imperial Economic Conference and the reorientation of Canadian trade," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 19-39.
    20. Brunt, Liam & Cannon, Edmund, 2015. "Variations in the price and quality of English grain, 1750-1914:quantitative evidence and empirical implications," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 6/2015, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    21. Linhui Yu & Jiangyong Lu & Pinliang Luo, 2013. "The Evolution of Price Dispersion in China's Passenger Car Markets," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(7), pages 947-965, July.

Articles

  1. William Hynes & Patrick Holden, 2016. "What future for the Global Aid for Trade Initiative? Towards an assessment of its achievements and limitations," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(4), pages 593-619, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Keijzer, Niels & Bartels, Lorand, 2017. "Assessing the legal and political implications of the post-Cotonou negotiations for the Economic Partnership Agreements," Discussion Papers 4/2017, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
    2. Beata Udvari, 2016. "The Aid for Trade initiative and the export performance of the Iberian EU-countries," IWE Working Papers 225, Institute for World Economics - Centre for Economic and Regional Studies- Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  2. William Hynes, 2014. "To what extent were economic factors important in the separation of the south of Ireland from the United Kingdom and what was the economic impact?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 369-397.

    Cited by:

    1. Frank Barry, 2014. "Diversifying External Linkages: The Exercise of Irish Economic Sovereignty in Long-Term Perspective," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp448, IIIS.

  3. William Hynes & David S. Jacks & Kevin H. O'rourke, 2012. "Commodity market disintegration in the interwar period," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 119-143, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2009-03-07 2009-03-14
  2. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2016-12-18
  3. NEP-PPM: Project, Program & Portfolio Management (1) 2016-12-18

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