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Defying Gravity: The 1932 Imperial Economic Conference and the Reorientation of Canadian Trade

  • David S. Jacks

In the wake of the Great Depression, the Canadian government embarked on a stunning reversal in its commercial policy. A key element of its response was the promotion of intra-imperial trade at the Imperial Economic Conference of 1932. This paper addresses whether or not Canadian trade was able to defy gravity and divert trade flows towards other signatories at Ottawa. The results strongly suggest that the conference was a failure from the Canadian perspective. Potential sources of this failure include unreasonable expectations about the likely reductions in trade costs and a neglect of key considerations related to certainty and credibility.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 17242.

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Date of creation: Jul 2011
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Publication status: published as Explorations in Economic History Volume 53, July 2014, Pages 19–39 Cover image Defying gravity: The Imperial Economic Conference and the reorientation of Canadian trade ☆ David S. Jacks
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17242
Note: DAE
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