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One is not enough! An economic history perspective on world trade collapses and deglobalization

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  • van Bergeijk, P.A.G.

Abstract

This paper provides a comparative economic history perspective on two significant periods of deglobalization: the Great Depression in the 1930s and the period following the Financial Crisis of 2008/9. The paper discusses differences and similarities and provides empirical results regarding the correlates of deglobalization, including the political system (institutions), level of development (GDP per capita) and the share of manufacturing.

Suggested Citation

  • van Bergeijk, P.A.G., 2017. "One is not enough! An economic history perspective on world trade collapses and deglobalization," ISS Working Papers - General Series 98695, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:euriss:98695
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    File URL: https://repub.eur.nl/pub/98695/wp628.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel Paravisini & Veronica Rappoport & Philipp Schnabl & Daniel Wolfenzon, 2015. "Dissecting the Effect of Credit Supply on Trade: Evidence from Matched Credit-Export Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(1), pages 333-359.
    2. Eichengreen, Barry & Irwin, Douglas A., 2010. "The Slide to Protectionism in the Great Depression: Who Succumbed and Why?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 70(04), pages 871-897, December.
    3. Andrei A. Levchenko & Logan Lewis & Linda L. Tesar, 2009. "The Collapse of International Trade During the 2008-2009 Crisis: In Search of the Smoking Gun," Working Papers 592, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
    4. van Bergeijk, P.A.G., 2015. "The heterogeneity of world trade collapses," ISS Working Papers - General Series 606, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    5. Peter A.G. van Bergeijk, 2010. "On the Brink of Deglobalization," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14122.
    6. Jacks, David S. & Meissner, Christopher M. & Novy, Dennis, 2011. "Trade booms, trade busts, and trade costs," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 185-201, March.
    7. Peter A.G. Van Bergeijk, 2009. "Expected Extent and Potential Duration of the World Import Crunch," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 479-487, November.
    8. Andrei A Levchenko & Logan T Lewis & Linda L Tesar, 2010. "The Collapse of International Trade during the 2008–09 Crisis: In Search of the Smoking Gun," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 58(2), pages 214-253, December.
    9. Chor, Davin & Manova, Kalina, 2012. "Off the cliff and back? Credit conditions and international trade during the global financial crisis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 117-133.
    10. Constantinescu, Cristina & Mattoo, Aaditya & Ruta, Michele, 2016. "Does the global trade slowdown matter?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 711-722.
    11. Mayda, Anna Maria & Rodrik, Dani, 2005. "Why are some people (and countries) more protectionist than others?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1393-1430, August.
    12. Calista Cheung & Stéphanie Guichard, 2009. "Understanding the World Trade Collapse," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 729, OECD Publishing.
    13. Peter A.G. van Bergeijk, 2013. "The World Trade Collapse and International Value Chains: A Cross-Country Perspective," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 41-53, March.
    14. Toke S. Aidt & Martin Gassebner, 2010. "Do Autocratic States Trade Less?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 24(1), pages 38-76, January.
    15. Kishore Gawande & Bernard Hoekman & Yue Cui, 2015. "Global Supply Chains and Trade Policy Responses to the 2008 Crisis," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(1), pages 102-128.
    16. di Mauro, Filippo & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Vicard, Vincent & Altomonte, Carlo & Rungi, Armando, 2012. "Global value chains during the great trade collapse: a bullwhip effect?," Working Paper Series 1412, European Central Bank.
    17. Antoni Estevadeordal & Brian Frantz & Alan M. Taylor, 2003. "The Rise and Fall of World Trade, 1870–1939," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(2), pages 359-407.
    18. Jakob B. Madsen, 2001. "Trade Barriers and the Collapse of World Trade During the Great Depression," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(4), pages 848-868, April.
    19. repec:bla:presci:v:96:y:2017:i:1:p:13-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Axel Dreher, 2006. "Does globalization affect growth? Evidence from a new index of globalization," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(10), pages 1091-1110.
    21. van Marrewijk, Charles & van Bergeijk, Peter A. G., 1993. "Endogenous trade uncertainty : Why countries may specialize against comparative advantage," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 681-694, November.
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    25. Agnès Bénassy-Quéré & Yvan Decreux & Lionel Fontagné & David Khoudour-Castéras, 2009. "Economic Crisis and Global Supply Chains," Working Papers 2009-15, CEPII research center.
    26. David Haugh & Alexandre Kopoin & Elena Rusticelli & David Turner & Richard Dutu, 2016. "Cardiac Arrest or Dizzy Spell: Why is World Trade So Weak and What can Policy Do About It?," OECD Economic Policy Papers 18, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:presci:v:96:y:2017:i:1:p:3-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Rodr�guez-Pose, Andr�s, 2017. "The revenge of the places that don't matter (and what to do about it)," CEPR Discussion Papers 12473, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    deglobalization; world trade collapse; economic history; value chains; politics and trade; 1930s; world trade slowdown;

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