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The Declining Barriers to Foreign Direct Investments and How to See Them

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  • Christian Gormsen

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics)

Abstract

Although Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) are as important to the world economy as exports, the extensive literature on trade costs has no strong parallel for FDI. Data are hard to come by, and many of the barriers to FDI are unobservable. This paper circumvents the problem by inferring the barriers to FDI that are consistent with observed FDI data. I describe the distribution and evolution of these barriers to FDI between pairs of 28 OECD countries from 1985 to 2008. On average, barriers to FDI were halved every 4.8 years. Geography is a key determinant, but GDP per capita also plays a leading role. Decomposing the growth in FDI, I show that it has mainly been driven by lower bilateral barriers (75%), not by economic growth, and that bilateral FDI stocks will tend to crowd each other out, lowering their yearly growth by -3%.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Gormsen, 2012. "The Declining Barriers to Foreign Direct Investments and How to See Them," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00676508, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:halshs-00676508
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00676508
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shawn Arita & Kiyoyasu Tanaka, 2014. "Heterogeneous multinational firms and productivity gains from falling FDI barriers," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 150(1), pages 83-113, February.
    2. Sébastien Miroudot & Ben Shepherd, 2014. "The Paradox of ‘Preferences’: Regional Trade Agreements and Trade Costs in Services," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(12), pages 1751-1772, December.
    3. Arita, Shawn & Tanaka, Kiyoyasu, 2013. "FDI and investment barriers in developing economies," IDE Discussion Papers 431, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign direct investment; economic integration; gravity.; Investissements direct à l'étranger; intégration économique; gravité.;

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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