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FDI and investment barriers in developing economies

Author

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  • Arita, Shawn
  • Tanaka, Kiyoyasu

Abstract

Does investment liberalization in developing economies affect FDI decisions differently across individual firms? To address this question, we simulate the response of individual firms to reductions in investment costs across developing economies. We explore two policy experiments: elimination of setup-procedure requirements for foreign investors and a reduction in corporate tax rates on foreign-owned multinationals. We find that a relaxing of discriminatory foreign investment procedures induces middle productive firms to increase their entry and production in developing economies substantially, but the most productive firms to expand moderately. Multinationals expand their entry and production in developing economies more substantially following a decline in entry barriers than following a decrease in corporate tax rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Arita, Shawn & Tanaka, Kiyoyasu, 2013. "FDI and investment barriers in developing economies," IDE Discussion Papers 431, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper431
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    File URL: https://ir.ide.go.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=37744&item_no=1&attribute_id=22&file_no=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Developing countries; Foreign investments; International business enterprises; FDI; Firm heterogeneity; Investment liberalization;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy

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