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Maryam Dilmaghani

Personal Details

First Name:Maryam
Middle Name:
Last Name:Dilmaghani
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pdi151
http://www.neuropsyconomics.com/
Saint Mary’s University, Sobey School of Business, Department of Economics,923 Robie Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H-3C3.
Tel: (902) 491-8651

Affiliation

(90%) Economics Department
Sobey School of Business
Saint Mary's University

Halifax, Canada
http://www.smu.ca/academic/sobey/faculty/faculty-economics.html

: (902) 420-5671
(902) 420-5129

RePEc:edi:edstmca (more details at EDIRC)

(10%) Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherche en Analyse des Organisations (CIRANO)

Montréal, Canada
http://www.cirano.qc.ca/

: (514) 985-4000
(514) 985-4039
1130 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, suite 1400, Montréal, Quéc, H3A 2M8
RePEc:edi:ciranca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2018. "Sexual Orientation, Labour Earnings, and Household Income in Canada," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 41-55, March.
  2. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Religiosity and social trust: evidence from Canada," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 75(1), pages 49-75, January.
  3. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Civic participation of secular groups in Canada," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 75(4), pages 523-543, October.
  4. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Religiosity and Labour Earnings in Canadian Provinces," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 82-99, March.
  5. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Revisiting sacrifice and stigma: Why older churches become more liberal," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 75(4), pages 489-509, October.
  6. Maryam Dilmaghani & Jason Dean, 2016. "Religiosity and female labour market attainment in Canada: the Protestant exception," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(3), pages 244-262, March.
  7. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2015. "Religiosity, gender, and wage: the differentiated impact of private prayer in Canada," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(10), pages 888-905, October.
  8. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2014. "Dynamics of social influence: an evolutionary approach," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(2), pages 123-145, January.
  9. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2011. "Religiosity, human capital return and earnings in Canada," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(1/2), pages 55-80, December.
  10. Green, Chris & Baksi, Soham & Dilmaghani, Maryam, 2007. "Challenges to a climate stabilizing energy future," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 616-626, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Maryam Dilmaghani & Jason Dean, 2016. "Religiosity and female labour market attainment in Canada: the Protestant exception," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(3), pages 244-262, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Religiosity and Labour Earnings in Canadian Provinces," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 82-99, March.
    2. Fischer, Justina A.V. & Pastore, Francesco, 2015. "Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis: Religion and Female Employment over Time," IZA Discussion Papers 9244, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Eman Abdelhadi & Paula England, 2018. "Do Values Explain the Low Employment Levels of Muslim Women Around the World? A Within-and between-Country Analysis," Working Papers 20180015, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Mar 2018.

  2. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2015. "Religiosity, gender, and wage: the differentiated impact of private prayer in Canada," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(10), pages 888-905, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Religiosity and Labour Earnings in Canadian Provinces," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 82-99, March.

  3. Green, Chris & Baksi, Soham & Dilmaghani, Maryam, 2007. "Challenges to a climate stabilizing energy future," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 616-626, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Maslyuk, Svetlana & Dharmaratna, Dinusha, 2013. "Renewable Electricity Generation, CO2 Emissions and Economic Growth: Evidence from Middle-Income Countries in Asia /Generación de electricidad renovable, las emisiones de CO2 y crecimiento económico: ," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 217-244, Enero.
    2. Chien, Taichen & Hu, Jin-Li, 2008. "Renewable energy: An efficient mechanism to improve GDP," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 3035-3042, August.
    3. Zouaoui, Ahlem & Zili-Ghedira, Leila & Ben Nasrallah, Sassi, 2016. "Open solid desiccant cooling air systems: A review and comparative study," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 889-917.
    4. Enteria, Napoleon & Mizutani, Kunio, 2011. "The role of the thermally activated desiccant cooling technologies in the issue of energy and environment," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 2095-2122, May.
    5. Kimitoshi Sato, 2015. "Anthropogenic Climate Change in an Integrated Energy Balance Model of Global and Urban Warming," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 4(1), pages 1-21, December.
    6. Yunfa Zhu & Madanmohan Ghosh, 2014. "Temperature control, emission abatement and costs: key EMF 27 results from Environment Canada’s Integrated Assessment Model," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 571-582, April.
    7. Mathews, John, 2007. "Seven steps to curb global warming," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 4247-4259, August.
    8. Baksi, Soham & Green, Chris, 2007. "Calculating economy-wide energy intensity decline rate: The role of sectoral output and energy shares," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 6457-6466, December.
    9. Hofman, Karen & Li, Xianguo, 2009. "Canada's energy perspectives and policies for sustainable development," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 86(4), pages 407-415, April.
    10. Edmonds, James & Calvin, Katherine & Clarke, Leon & Kyle, Page & Wise, Marshall, 2012. "Energy and technology lessons since Rio," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S1), pages 7-14.
    11. Frank Beckenbach & Ramón Briegel, 2010. "Multi-agent modeling of economic innovation dynamics and its implications for analyzing emission impacts," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 317-341, August.

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

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