IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/iecepo/v7y2010i2p317-341.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Multi-agent modeling of economic innovation dynamics and its implications for analyzing emission impacts

Author

Listed:
  • Frank Beckenbach

    ()

  • Ramón Briegel

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Beckenbach & Ramón Briegel, 2010. "Multi-agent modeling of economic innovation dynamics and its implications for analyzing emission impacts," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 317-341, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:iecepo:v:7:y:2010:i:2:p:317-341
    DOI: 10.1007/s10368-010-0167-7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10368-010-0167-7
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fagiolo, Giorgio & Dosi, Giovanni, 2003. "Exploitation, exploration and innovation in a model of endogenous growth with locally interacting agents," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 237-273, September.
    2. Herbert Simon, 2000. "Bounded rationality in social science: Today and tomorrow," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 1(1), pages 25-39, March.
    3. Kirman, Alan P. & Vriend, Nicolaas J., 2001. "Evolving market structure: An ACE model of price dispersion and loyalty," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 459-502, March.
    4. Ajzen, Icek, 1991. "The theory of planned behavior," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 179-211, December.
    5. Tesfatsion, Leigh & Judd, Kenneth L., 2006. "Handbook of Computational Economics, Vol. 2: Agent-Based Computational Economics," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10368, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
    7. Fine, Ben, 2000. "Endogenous Growth Theory: A Critical Assessment," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 245-265, March.
    8. Klos, Tomas B. & Nooteboom, Bart, 2001. "Agent-based computational transaction cost economics," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 503-526, March.
    9. Leontief, Wassily, 1991. "The economy as a circular flow," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 181-212, June.
    10. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    11. Green, Chris & Baksi, Soham & Dilmaghani, Maryam, 2007. "Challenges to a climate stabilizing energy future," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 616-626, January.
    12. Michael Prietula & Kathleen Carley & Les Gasser (ed.), 1998. "Simulating Organizations: Computational Models of Institutions and Groups," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026266108x, January.
    13. Dawid, Herbert, 2006. "Agent-based Models of Innovation and Technological Change," Handbook of Computational Economics,in: Leigh Tesfatsion & Kenneth L. Judd (ed.), Handbook of Computational Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 25, pages 1235-1272 Elsevier.
    14. Frederic Lee & Steve Keen, 2004. "The Incoherent Emperor: A Heterodox Critique of Neoclassical Microeconomic Theory," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 62(2), pages 169-199.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Balint, T. & Lamperti, F. & Mandel, A. & Napoletano, M. & Roventini, A. & Sapio, A., 2017. "Complexity and the Economics of Climate Change: A Survey and a Look Forward," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 252-265.
    2. Deniz Erdem, 2011. "Foreign Direct Investments, Energy Efficiency and Innovation Dynamics," EIIW Discussion paper disbei189, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
    3. Deniz Erdem, 2012. "Foreign direct investments, energy efficiency, and innovation dynamics," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 24(2), pages 119-133, June.
    4. Sylvie Geisendorf, 2016. "The impact of personal beliefs on climate change: the “battle of perspectives” revisited," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 551-580, July.
    5. Birchenhall Chris & Windrum Paul, 2014. "Global Warming: Technology, Preferences and Policy," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 234(2-3), pages 366-387, April.
    6. Tomas Balint & Francesco Lamperti & Antoine Mandel & Mauro Napoletano & Andrea Roventini & Sandro Sapio, 2017. "Complexity and the economics of climate change : a survey and a look foreward," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/1nlv566svi8, Sciences Po.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:iecepo:v:7:y:2010:i:2:p:317-341. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.