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Energy and technology lessons since Rio


  • Edmonds, James
  • Calvin, Katherine
  • Clarke, Leon
  • Kyle, Page
  • Wise, Marshall


The 1992 Framework Convention on Climate Change created the basic international architecture for addressing climate change. That treaty was negotiated at a time when the research literature examining emissions mitigation and the role of energy technology was relatively limited. In the two subsequent decades a great deal has been learned. The problem of stabilizing the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has proved far more difficult than envisioned in 1992 and the role of technology appears even more important when emissions mitigation strategies are co-developed in the context of multiple competing ends.

Suggested Citation

  • Edmonds, James & Calvin, Katherine & Clarke, Leon & Kyle, Page & Wise, Marshall, 2012. "Energy and technology lessons since Rio," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S1), pages 7-14.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:34:y:2012:i:s1:p:s7-s14 DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2012.08.037

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. McJeon, Haewon C. & Clarke, Leon & Kyle, Page & Wise, Marshall & Hackbarth, Andrew & Bryant, Benjamin P. & Lempert, Robert J., 2011. "Technology interactions among low-carbon energy technologies: What can we learn from a large number of scenarios?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 619-631, July.
    6. Callan, Tim & Lyons, Sean & Scott, Susan & Tol, Richard S.J. & Verde, Stefano, 2009. "The distributional implications of a carbon tax in Ireland," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 407-412, February.
    7. Nemet, Gregory F. & Kammen, Daniel M., 2007. "U.S. energy research and development: Declining investment, increasing need, and the feasibility of expansion," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 746-755, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yunfa Zhu & Madanmohan Ghosh, 2014. "Temperature control, emission abatement and costs: key EMF 27 results from Environment Canada’s Integrated Assessment Model," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 571-582, April.
    2. Son Kim & Kenichi Wada & Atsushi Kurosawa & Matthew Roberts, 2014. "Nuclear energy response in the EMF27 study," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 443-460, April.
    3. Chaturvedi, Vaibhav & Clarke, Leon & Edmonds, James & Calvin, Katherine & Kyle, Page, 2014. "Capital investment requirements for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation in power generation on near term to century time scales and global to regional spatial scales," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 267-278.
    4. Chaturvedi, Vaibhav & Kim, Sonny & Smith, Steven J. & Clarke, Leon & Yuyu, Zhou & Kyle, Page & Patel, Pralit, 2013. "Model evaluation and hindcasting: An experiment with an integrated assessment model," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 479-490.
    5. Karlsson, Rasmus, 2012. "Carbon lock-in, rebound effects and China at the limits of statism," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 939-945.
    6. Schmalensee, Richard, 2012. "From “Green Growth” to sound policies: An overview," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S1), pages 2-6.

    More about this item


    Climate change; Energy; Technology;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting


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