IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/econom/v187y2015i2p521-531.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Smile from the past: A general option pricing framework with multiple volatility and leverage components

Author

Listed:
  • Majewski, Adam A.
  • Bormetti, Giacomo
  • Corsi, Fulvio

Abstract

In the current literature, the analytical tractability of discrete time option pricing models is guaranteed only for rather specific types of models and pricing kernels. We propose a very general and fully analytical option pricing framework, encompassing a wide class of discrete time models featuring multiple-component structure in both volatility and leverage, and a flexible pricing kernel with multiple risk premia. Although the proposed framework is general enough to include either GARCH-type volatility, Realized Volatility or a combination of the two, in this paper we focus on realized volatility option pricing models by extending the Heterogeneous Autoregressive Gamma (HARG) model of Corsi et al. (2013) to incorporate heterogeneous leverage structures with multiple components, while preserving closed-form solutions for option prices. Applying our analytically tractable asymmetric HARG model to a large sample of S&P 500 index options, we demonstrate its superior ability to price out-of-the-money options compared to existing benchmarks.

Suggested Citation

  • Majewski, Adam A. & Bormetti, Giacomo & Corsi, Fulvio, 2015. "Smile from the past: A general option pricing framework with multiple volatility and leverage components," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 187(2), pages 521-531.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:187:y:2015:i:2:p:521-531
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jeconom.2015.02.036
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304407615000615
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Corsi, Fulvio & Pirino, Davide & Renò, Roberto, 2010. "Threshold bipower variation and the impact of jumps on volatility forecasting," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 159(2), pages 276-288, December.
    2. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2006. "Econometrics of Testing for Jumps in Financial Economics Using Bipower Variation," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 4(1), pages 1-30.
    3. Peter Christoffersen & Steven Heston & Kris Jacobs, 2013. "Capturing Option Anomalies with a Variance-Dependent Pricing Kernel," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 26(8), pages 1963-2006.
    4. Pan, Jun, 2002. "The jump-risk premia implicit in options: evidence from an integrated time-series study," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 3-50, January.
    5. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold, 2007. "Roughing It Up: Including Jump Components in the Measurement, Modeling, and Forecasting of Return Volatility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(4), pages 701-720, November.
    6. Fulvio Corsi & Roberto Renò, 2012. "Discrete-Time Volatility Forecasting With Persistent Leverage Effect and the Link With Continuous-Time Volatility Modeling," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 368-380, January.
    7. Tobias Adrian & Joshua Rosenberg, 2008. "Stock Returns and Volatility: Pricing the Short-Run and Long-Run Components of Market Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(6), pages 2997-3030, December.
    8. Zhang, Lan & Mykland, Per A. & Ait-Sahalia, Yacine, 2005. "A Tale of Two Time Scales: Determining Integrated Volatility With Noisy High-Frequency Data," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 100, pages 1394-1411, December.
    9. Christoffersen, Peter & Jacobs, Kris & Ornthanalai, Chayawat & Wang, Yintian, 2008. "Option valuation with long-run and short-run volatility components," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(3), pages 272-297, December.
    10. Scharth, Marcel & Medeiros, Marcelo C., 2009. "Asymmetric effects and long memory in the volatility of Dow Jones stocks," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 304-327.
    11. Muller, Ulrich A. & Dacorogna, Michel M. & Dave, Rakhal D. & Olsen, Richard B. & Pictet, Olivier V. & von Weizsacker, Jacob E., 1997. "Volatilities of different time resolutions -- Analyzing the dynamics of market components," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 4(2-3), pages 213-239, June.
    12. Fulvio Corsi, 2009. "A Simple Approximate Long-Memory Model of Realized Volatility," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 7(2), pages 174-196, Spring.
    13. Bates, David S, 1996. "Jumps and Stochastic Volatility: Exchange Rate Processes Implicit in Deutsche Mark Options," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 9(1), pages 69-107.
    14. Glosten, Lawrence R & Jagannathan, Ravi & Runkle, David E, 1993. " On the Relation between the Expected Value and the Volatility of the Nominal Excess Return on Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(5), pages 1779-1801, December.
    15. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Shephard, 2002. "Econometric analysis of realized volatility and its use in estimating stochastic volatility models," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 64(2), pages 253-280.
    16. Jing-zhi Huang & Liuren Wu, 2004. "Specification Analysis of Option Pricing Models Based on Time-Changed Lévy Processes," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(3), pages 1405-1440, June.
    17. Christoffersen, Peter & Feunou, Bruno & Jacobs, Kris & Meddahi, Nour, 2014. "The Economic Value of Realized Volatility: Using High-Frequency Returns for Option Valuation," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(03), pages 663-697, June.
    18. Fabienne Comte & Eric Renault, 1998. "Long memory in continuous-time stochastic volatility models," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(4), pages 291-323.
    19. Laurent E. Calvet, 2004. "How to Forecast Long-Run Volatility: Regime Switching and the Estimation of Multifractal Processes," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 2(1), pages 49-83.
    20. Gang Li & Chu Zhang, 2010. "On the Number of State Variables in Options Pricing," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 56(11), pages 2058-2075, November.
    21. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold & Paul Labys, 2003. "Modeling and Forecasting Realized Volatility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(2), pages 579-625, March.
    22. Gourieroux, C. & Monfort, A., 2007. "Econometric specification of stochastic discount factor models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 136(2), pages 509-530, February.
    23. Baillie, Richard T. & Bollerslev, Tim & Mikkelsen, Hans Ole, 1996. "Fractionally integrated generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 3-30, September.
    24. Bjørn Eraker, 2004. "Do Stock Prices and Volatility Jump? Reconciling Evidence from Spot and Option Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(3), pages 1367-1404, June.
    25. Corsi, Fulvio & Fusari, Nicola & La Vecchia, Davide, 2013. "Realizing smiles: Options pricing with realized volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 284-304.
    26. Merton, Robert C., 1976. "Option pricing when underlying stock returns are discontinuous," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1-2), pages 125-144.
    27. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2002. "Estimating quadratic variation using realized variance," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 457-477.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chang, Chia-Lin & McAleer, Michael, 2015. "Econometric analysis of financial derivatives: An overview," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 187(2), pages 403-407.
    2. Proietti, Tommaso, 2014. "Exponential Smoothing, Long Memory and Volatility Prediction," MPRA Paper 57230, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Fengler, Matthias & Melnikov, Alexander, 2017. "GARCH option pricing models with Meixner innovations," Economics Working Paper Series 1702, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    4. Chang, C-L. & McAleer, M.J., 2014. "Econometric Analysis of Financial Derivatives," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2015-02, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    5. repec:wsi:apjorx:v:34:y:2017:i:01:n:s0217595917400097 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:oup:jfinec:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:106-138. is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:187:y:2015:i:2:p:521-531. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jeconom .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.