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Banking globalization, local lending, and labor market effects: Micro-level evidence from Brazil

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  • Noth, Felix
  • Ossandon Busch, Matias

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of a foreign funding shock to banks in Brazil after the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008. Our robust results show that bank-specific shocks to Brazilian parent banks negatively affected lending by their individual branches and trigger real economic consequences in Brazilian municipalities: More affected regions face restrictions in aggregated credit and show weaker labor market performance in the aftermath which documents the transmission mechanism of the global financial crisis to local labor markets in emerging countries. The results represent relevant information for regulators concerned with the real effects of cross-border liquidity shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Noth, Felix & Ossandon Busch, Matias, 2017. "Banking globalization, local lending, and labor market effects: Micro-level evidence from Brazil," IWH Discussion Papers 7/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:iwhdps:72017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Boutin, Xavier & Cestone, Giacinta & Fumagalli, Chiara & Pica, Giovanni & Serrano-Velarde, Nicolas, 2013. "The deep-pocket effect of internal capital markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 122-145.
    2. Lambert, Claudia & Noth, Felix & Schüwer, Ulrich, 2017. "How do insured deposits affect bank risk? Evidence from the 2008 Emergency Economic Stabilization Act," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 81-102.
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    5. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy & Analia Schlosser, 2010. "Multiple Experiments for the Causal Link between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(4), pages 773-824, October.
    6. Coleman, Nicholas & Feler, Leo, 2015. "Bank ownership, lending, and local economic performance during the 2008–2009 financial crisis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 50-66.
    7. Nicola Cetorelli & Linda S Goldberg, 2011. "Global Banks and International Shock Transmission: Evidence from the Crisis," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(1), pages 41-76, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Becker, Chris & Ossandon Busch, Matias & Tonzer, Lena, 2017. "Macroprudential policy and intra-group dynamics: The effects of reserve requirements in Brazil," IWH Discussion Papers 21/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    2. Littke, Helge C. N. & Ossandon Busch, Matias, 2018. "Banks fearing the drought? Liquidity hoarding as a response to idiosyncratic interbank funding dry-ups," IWH Discussion Papers 12/2018, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    3. Nicholas Coleman & Ricardo Correa & Leo Feler & Jason Goldrosen, 2017. "Internal Liquidity Management and Local Credit Provision," International Finance Discussion Papers 1204, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial crisis; international shock transmission; bank lending; labor markets outcomes;

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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