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Banking Integration and House Price Comovement

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  • Landier, Augustin
  • Sraer, David
  • Thesmar, David

Abstract

The correlation across US states in house price growth increased steadily between 1976 and 2000. This paper shows that the contemporaneous geographic integration of the US banking market, via the emergence of large banks, was a primary driver of this phenomenon. To this end, we first theoretically derive an appropriate measure of banking integration across state pairs and document that house price growth correlation is strongly related to this measure of financial integration. Our IV estimates suggest that banking integration can explain up to one third of the rise in house price correlation over the period.

Suggested Citation

  • Landier, Augustin & Sraer, David & Thesmar, David, 2014. "Banking Integration and House Price Comovement," CEPR Discussion Papers 10295, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10295
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Itzhak Ben-DAVID & Francesco A. FRANZONI & Rabih MOUSSAWI & John SEDUNOV III, 2015. "The Granular Nature of Large Institutional Investors," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 15-67, Swiss Finance Institute, revised Apr 2016.
    2. Adrian Alter & Jane Dokko & Dulani Seneviratne, 2018. "House Price Synchronicity, Banking Integration, and Global Financial Conditions," IMF Working Papers 18/250, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Weida Kuang & Qilin Wang, 2018. "Cultural similarities and housing market linkage: evidence from OECD countries," Frontiers of Business Research in China, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, December.
    4. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi & Emil Verner, 2017. "How do Credit Supply Shocks Affect the Real Economy? Evidence from the United States in the 1980s," NBER Working Papers 23802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Teng Wang, 2020. "Branching Networks and Geographic Contagion of Commodity Price Shocks," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-034, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Lei Hou & Wei Long & Qi Li, 2019. "Comovement of Home Prices: A Conditional Copula Approach," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 20(1), pages 297-318, May.
    7. Milcheva, Stanimira & Zhu, Bing, 2016. "Bank integration and co-movements across housing markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(S), pages 148-171.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    banking deregulation; comovement; real estate;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • R30 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - General

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