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Implications of the globalization of the banking sector: the Latin American experience

  • Joe Peek
  • Eric S. Rosengren

Foreign entry into domestic banking markets remains a contentious issue. Whether privatizing a state bank in Brazil or selling a failed bank in Japan, the proposed sale of a large domestic financial institution, possibly to a foreign acquirer, frequently results in a major controversy. Many Asian countries have yet to experience major foreign penetration of domestic banking markets, while Latin American countries have privatized many of their banks and have encouraged foreign banks to enter their domestic markets. ; Because many Latin American countries opened their markets during the 1990s, and because they have experienced exchange rate and banking crises as well as severe fluctuations in their macroeconomies over this period, Latin American countries provide a good laboratory for understanding the effects of foreign bank penetration. The authors examine the legal and economic conditions that have affected foreign bank penetration in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico and review how foreign banks have reacted to recent crises affecting these countries. They find that foreign banks viewed the economic problems as providing opportunities to expand, either by acquisition or by internal growth of existing subsidiaries. The same was not true for offshore lending, however.

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Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Boston in its journal New England Economic Review.

Volume (Year): (2000)
Issue (Month): Sep ()
Pages: 45-62

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:2000:i:sep:p:45-62
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  1. Clarke, George R. G. & Cull, Robert & D'Amato, Laura & Molinari, Andrea, 1999. "The effect of foreign entry on Argentina's domestic banking sector," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2158, The World Bank.
  2. B. Gerard Dages & Linda S. Goldberg & Daniel Kinney, 2000. "Foreign and domestic bank participation in emerging markets: lessons from Mexico and Argentina," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sep, pages 17-36.
  3. Dario Focarelli & Alberto Franco Pozzolo, 2000. "The Determinants of Cross-Border Bank Shareholdings; an Analysis with Bank-Level Data from OECD Countries," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 381, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  4. Patrick Honohan & Daniela Klingebiel, 2000. "Controlling fiscal costs of banking crises," Proceedings 682, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  5. Daniel E. Nolle & Rama Seth, 1996. "Do banks follow their customers abroad?," Research Paper 9620, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  6. Honohan, Patrick & Klingebiel, Daniela, 2000. "Controlling the fiscal costs of banking crises," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2441, The World Bank.
  7. Peek, Joe & Rosengren, Eric S, 1997. "The International Transmission of Financial Shocks: The Case of Japan," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(4), pages 495-505, September.
  8. Claessens, Stijn & Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Huizinga, Harry, 1998. "How does foreign entry affect the domestic banking market?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1918, The World Bank.
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