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Selection and Performance in Post-Compulsory Education

Author

Listed:
  • Uzma Ahmad

    (Sheffield International College, University of Sheffield)

  • Steven McIntosh

    (Department of Economics, University of Sheffield)

  • Gurleen Popli

    (Department of Economics, University of Sheffield)

Abstract

This paper investigates the determinants of participation and performance in post-compulsory education, controlling for the selection into post-compulsory education and prior attainment, using a unique primary dataset on pupils studying in the post-compulsory grade in 2011-2012 from one district of the Punjab province of Pakistan. The main findings of the paper show that participation and performance in post-compulsory education are two different processes, with participation being driven by availability of post-compulsory institutions within travel distance, while performance, once in post-compulsory education, is determined by ability. The results further highlight that distance reduces participation most for those living in rural areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Uzma Ahmad & Steven McIntosh & Gurleen Popli, 2019. "Selection and Performance in Post-Compulsory Education," Working Papers 2019014, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2019014
    as

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    File URL: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/economics/research/serps/articles/2019_014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    post-compulsory education; participation; performance; distance; selection; Pakistan;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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