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The Impact of Distance to Nearest Education Institution on the Post-Compulsory Education Participation Decision

Author

Listed:
  • Andy Dickerson

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

  • Steven McIntosh

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

Abstract

This paper uses data sources with the unique capacity to measure distances between home addresses and education institutions, to investigate, for the first time, the effect that such distance has on an individual's post-compulsory education participation decision. The results show that there is no overall net effect. However, when attention is focussed on young people who are on the margin of participating in post-compulsory education (according to their prior attainment and family background) and when post-compulsory education is distinguished by whether it leads to academic or vocational qualifications, then greater distance to nearest education institution is seen to have a significant impact on the decision to continue in full-time post-compulsory education. This finding has relevance for education participation in rural areas relative to urban areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Andy Dickerson & Steven McIntosh, 2010. "The Impact of Distance to Nearest Education Institution on the Post-Compulsory Education Participation Decision," Working Papers 2010007, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2010007
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    File URL: http://www.shef.ac.uk/economics/research/serps/articles/2010_007.html
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven Mcintosh, 2006. "Further Analysis of the Returns to Academic and Vocational Qualifications," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(2), pages 225-251, April.
    2. Dearden, Lorraine, et al, 2002. "The Returns to Academic and Vocational Qualifications in Britain," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(3), pages 249-274, July.
    3. Arnaud Chevalier, 2004. "Parental Education and Childs Education: A Natural Experiment," CEE Discussion Papers 0040, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    4. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
    5. Gavan Conlon, 2005. "The Determinants of Undertaking Academic and Vocational Qualifications in the United Kingdom," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 299-313.
    6. Pamela Lenton, 2005. "The school-to-work transition in England and Wales," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(2), pages 88-113, May.
    7. Patricia Rice, 1999. "The impact of local labour markets on investment in further education: Evidence from the England and Wales youth cohort studies," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(2), pages 287-312.
    8. McVicar, Duncan & Rice, Patricia, 2001. "Participation in Further Eduction in England and Wales: An Analysis of Post-War Trends," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(1), pages 47-66, January.
    9. Micklewright, John, 1989. "Choice at Sixteen," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 56(221), pages 25-39, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Leslie S. Stratton & Nabanita Datta Gupta & David Reimer & Anders Holm, 2017. "Modeling Enrollment in and Completion of Vocational Education: The Role of Cognitive and Non-cognitive Skills by Program Type," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 20172, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    2. Kenzo Asahi, 2014. "The Impact of Better School Accessibility on Student outcomes," SERC Discussion Papers 0156, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    3. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:63:y:2018:i:c:p:116-133 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Kobus, Martijn B.W. & Van Ommeren, Jos N. & Rietveld, Piet, 2015. "Student commute time, university presence and academic achievement," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 129-140.
    5. K. Bruce Newbold & W. Mark Brown, 2015. "The Urban–Rural Gap In University Attendance: Determinants Of University Participation Among Canadian Youth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 585-608, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    post-compulsory education participation; travel distance;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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