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Where do I go and what should I do? Routes through further education

  • Pamela Lenton


    (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

This paper investigates the educational attainment of young people between the ages of sixteen and eighteen after having entered full-time post-compulsory education. In particular we focus on the educational attainment and labour market trajectory of `underachievers´: young people who have chosen to remain in full-time education at age sixteen, despite not gaining the widely recognised U.K. academic benchmark of five GCSE grades A*-C. Our results suggest that the best route to educational success for young people considered as of lower ability at age 16 is through the FE college where they catch-up with their `more able´ counterparts by age 18.

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Paper provided by The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2006014.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2006
Date of revision: Dec 2006
Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2006014
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  1. Ermisch, John & Francesconi, Marco, 2001. "Family Matters: Impacts of Family Background on Educational Attainments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(270), pages 137-56, May.
  2. Eric A. Hanushek, 2002. "The Failure of Input-based Schooling Policies," NBER Working Papers 9040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Evans, William N & Schwab, Robert M, 1995. "Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 941-74, November.
  4. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
  5. Robertson, D. & Symons, J., 1988. "The Occupational Choice Of British Children," Papers 325, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
  6. repec:lan:wpaper:4343 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Steven McIntosh, 1998. "The Demand for Post-Compulsory Education in Four European Countries," CEP Discussion Papers dp0393, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. Hanushek, Eric A, 1992. "The Trade-Off between Child Quantity and Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 84-117, February.
  9. Janet Currie & Duncan Thomas, 1999. "Early Test Scores, Socioeconomic Status and Future Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 6943, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Andrews, Martyn & Bradley, Steve & Upward, Richard, 1999. "Estimating Youth Training Wage Differentials during and after Training," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(3), pages 517-44, July.
  11. repec:lan:wpaper:4770 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. David M. Blau, 1999. "The Effect Of Income On Child Development," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(2), pages 261-276, May.
  13. Akerhielm, Karen, 1995. "Does class size matter?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 229-241, September.
  14. Feinstein, Leon & Symons, James, 1999. "Attainment in Secondary School," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 300-321, April.
  15. repec:lan:wpaper:4468 is not listed on IDEAS
  16. Andrews, Martyn & Bradley, Steve, 1997. "Modelling the Transition from School and the Demand for Training in the United Kingdom," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 387-413, August.
  17. Jere R. Behrman & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2002. "Does Increasing Women's Schooling Raise the Schooling of the Next Generation?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 323-334, March.
  18. Pamela Lenton, 2005. "The school-to-work transition in England and Wales," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(2), pages 88-113, May.
  19. Damon Clark, 2002. "Participation in Post Compulsory Education in England: What explains the Boom and Bust," CEE Discussion Papers 0024, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
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