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School Quality and Staying-On in Northern Ireland - Resources, Peer Groups and Ethos

Author

Listed:
  • Duncan McVicar

    (Northern Ireland Economic Research Centre, Queen’s University Belfast)

Abstract

The paper examines career choice at age 16 in Northern Ireland using micro data for young people completing compulsory education in 1993. Explanatory variables include resourcerelated school characteristics, ethos-related characteristics and peer-group factors. The results suggest resources, ethos and peer group effects all play a significant role in career choice at age 16. Some of these factors, including pupil/teacher ratios, act in opposite directions on the probability of entry into Further Education College and of staying-on at school, suggesting studies of school quality on choice at age 16 should disaggregate post-compulsory education where possible.

Suggested Citation

  • Duncan McVicar, 2001. "School Quality and Staying-On in Northern Ireland - Resources, Peer Groups and Ethos," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 32(2), pages 131-151.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:32:y:2001:i:2:p:131-151
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    File URL: http://www.esr.ie/Vol32_2mcvicar.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:fth:prinin:366 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Dustmann, C. & Rajah, N. & van Soest, A.H.O., 1998. "School Quality, Exam Performance and Career Choice," Discussion Paper 1998-16, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. David Card & Alan B. Krueger, 1992. "School Quality and Black-White Relative Earnings: A Direct Assessment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 151-200.
    4. Andrews, Martyn & Bradley, Steve, 1997. "Modelling the Transition from School and the Demand for Training in the United Kingdom," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 387-413, August.
    5. Rice, P.G. & McVicar, D., 1996. "Participation in full-time further eduction in England and Wales: an analysis of post-war trends," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 9604, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
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    7. Rosalind Levacic & Stephen Machin & David Reynolds & Anna Vignoles & James Walker, 2000. "The Relationship between Resource Allocation and Pupil Attainment: A Review," CEE Discussion Papers 0002, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
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    9. David Card & Alan B. Krueger, 1996. "School Resources and Student Outcomes: An Overview of the Literature and New Evidence from North and South Carolina," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 31-50, Fall.
    10. Hanushek, Eric A., 2006. "School Resources," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    11. repec:lan:wpaper:1092 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Armstrong, David M, 1999. "School Performance and Staying on: A Micro Analysis for Northern Ireland," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 67(2), pages 203-230, March.
    13. Feinstein, Leon & Symons, James, 1999. "Attainment in Secondary School," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 300-321, April.
    14. Bradley, Steve & Taylor, Jim, 1998. "The Effect of School Size on Exam Performance in Secondary Schools," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(3), pages 291-324, August.
    15. William N. Evans & Robert M. Schwab, 1995. "Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 941-974.
    16. Rice, Patricia G, 1987. "The Demand for Post-compulsory Education in the UK and the Effects of Educational Maintenance Allowances," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 54(216), pages 465-475, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Fertig, 2002. "Educational Production, Endogenous Peer Group Formation and Class Composition – Evidence From the PISA 2000 Study," RWI Discussion Papers 0002, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
    2. Fertig, Michael, 2003. "Educational Production, Endogenous Peer Group Formation and Class Composition – Evidence from the PISA 2000 Study," IZA Discussion Papers 714, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Fertig, Michael, 2003. "Educational Production, Endogenous Peer Group Formation and Class Composition - Evidence From the PISA 2000 Study," RWI Discussion Papers 2, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
    4. repec:zbw:rwidps:0002 is not listed on IDEAS

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