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The Impact of Distance to Nearest Education Institution on the Post-compulsory Education Participation Decision

Listed author(s):
  • Andy Dickerson
  • Steven McIntosh

This paper uses data sources from England with the unique capacity to measure distances between home addresses and education institutions, to investigate, for the first time, the effect that such distance has on an individual’s post-compulsory education participation decision. The results show that there is a small overall effect. However, when attention is focused on young people who are on the margin of participating in post-compulsory education (according to their prior attainment and family background) and when post-compulsory education is distinguished by whether it leads to academic or vocational qualifications, then greater distance to nearest education institution is seen to have a significant impact on the decision to continue in full–time post-compulsory education.

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File URL: http://usj.sagepub.com/content/50/4/742.abstract
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Article provided by Urban Studies Journal Limited in its journal Urban Studies.

Volume (Year): 50 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (March)
Pages: 742-758

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Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:50:y:2013:i:4:p:742-758
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.gla.ac.uk/departments/urbanstudiesjournal

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  1. Steven Mcintosh, 2006. "Further Analysis of the Returns to Academic and Vocational Qualifications," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(2), pages 225-251, April.
  2. Gavan Conlon, 2005. "The Determinants of Undertaking Academic and Vocational Qualifications in the United Kingdom," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 299-313.
  3. Pamela Lenton, 2005. "The school-to-work transition in England and Wales," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(2), pages 88-113, May.
  4. Patricia Rice, 1999. "The impact of local labour markets on investment in further education: Evidence from the England and Wales youth cohort studies," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(2), pages 287-312.
  5. McVicar, Duncan & Rice, Patricia, 2001. "Participation in Further Eduction in England and Wales: An Analysis of Post-War Trends," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(1), pages 47-66, January.
  6. Arnaud Chevalier, 2004. "Parental education and child’s education : a natural experiment," Working Papers 200414, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  7. Dearden, Lorraine, et al, 2002. "The Returns to Academic and Vocational Qualifications in Britain," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(3), pages 249-274, July.
  8. Micklewright, John, 1989. "Choice at Sixteen," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 56(221), pages 25-39, February.
  9. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
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