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Geographical constraints and educational attainment

  • Bjarne Strøm

    ()

    (Deartment of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Torberg Falch

    ()

    (Deartment of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Päivi Lujala

    (Deartment of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

This paper estimates the impact of geographical proximity to upper secondary schools on graduation propensity. It uses detailed information on real travel time between students’ homes and schools in Norway and on the composition of study programs at each school. We find that reduced travel time has a positive effect on graduation. The result is robust to a number of specifications, including IV-models and difference-in-difference models. The effect seems to be concentrated on students with mediocre prior academic achievement, which suggests that mainly students at the margin of graduation are affected by geographical constraints.

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File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2011/9_Geographical%20constraints.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in its series Working Paper Series with number 11811.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 24 Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:11811
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