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Does distance determine who attends a university in Germany?

  • Spiess, C. Katharina
  • Wrohlich, Katharina

We analyze the role of distance to the nearest university in the demand for higher education in Germany. Distance could matter due to transaction costs or due to neighbourhood effects. We use data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) combined with a database on university postal codes to estimate a discrete choice model of the demand for higher education. We show that - controlling for other socio-economic and regional characteristics - distance to the nearest university at the time of completing secondary school significantly affects the decision to enrol in a university. Our empirical results further suggest that the distance effect is driven mainly by transaction costs rather than by neighbourhood effects.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 470-479

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:3:p:470-479
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  1. Frenette, Marc, 2009. "Do universities benefit local youth? Evidence from the creation of new universities," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 318-328, June.
  2. D. Vuri, 2008. "The effect of availability and distance to school on children's time allocation in Ghana and Guatemala," UCW Working Paper 40, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  3. Steiner, Viktor & Wrohlich, Katharina, 2008. "Financial Student Aid and Enrollment into Higher Education: New Evidence from Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 3601, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, J. -S., 2001. "Changes in the wage structure, family income, and children's education," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 890-904, May.
  5. Gert G. Wagner & Joachim R. Frick & Jürgen Schupp, 2007. "The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP): Scope, Evolution and Enhancements," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  6. Lauer, Charlotte, 2003. "Family background, cohort and education: A French-German comparison based on a multivariate ordered probit model of educational attainment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 231-251, April.
  7. Ira N. Gang & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2000. "Is Child like Parent? Educational Attainment and Ethnic Origin," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(3), pages 550-569.
  8. Shea, John, 2000. "Does parents' money matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 155-184, August.
  9. Gundi Knies & C. Katharina Spieß, 2007. "Regional Data in the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP)," Data Documentation 17, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  10. Stefan Denzler & Stefan C. Wolter, 2008. "Unsere zukünftigen Lehrerinnen und Lehrer – Institutionelle Faktoren bei der Wahl eines Studiums an einer Pädagogischen Hochschule," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0012, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  11. Michaela Sixt, 2007. "Die strukturelle und individuelle Dimension bei der Erklärung von regionaler Bildungsungleichheit," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 66, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  12. Marc Frenette, 2006. "Too Far to Go On? Distance to School and University Participation," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 31-58.
  13. Do, Chau, 2004. "The effects of local colleges on the quality of college attended," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 249-257, June.
  14. Marc Frenette, 2004. "Access to College and University: Does Distance to School Matter?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 30(4), pages 427-443, December.
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