IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/labeco/v10y2003i2p231-251.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Family background, cohort and education: A French-German comparison based on a multivariate ordered probit model of educational attainment

Author

Listed:
  • Lauer, Charlotte

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Lauer, Charlotte, 2003. "Family background, cohort and education: A French-German comparison based on a multivariate ordered probit model of educational attainment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 231-251, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:10:y:2003:i:2:p:231-251
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927-5371(03)00007-1
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1998. "Life Cycle Schooling and Dynamic Selection Bias: Models and Evidence for Five Cohorts of American Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(2), pages 262-333, April.
    2. Lauer, Charlotte, 2001. "Educational attainment: a French-German comparison," ZEW Dokumentationen 01-02, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Dominique Goux & Éric Maurin, 1997. "Destinées sociales : le rôle de l'école et du milieu d'origine," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 306(1), pages 13-26.
    4. Claude Thélot & Louis-André Vallet, 2000. "La réduction des inégalités sociales devant l'école depuis le début du siècle," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 334(1), pages 3-32.
    5. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1993. "Intergenerational Support and the Life-Cycle Incomes of Young Men and Their Parents: Human Capital Investments, Coresidence, and Intergenerational Financial Transfers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 84-112, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bodo Knoll & Nadine Riedel & Eva Schlenker, 2017. "He's a Chip Off the Old Block — The Persistence of Occupational Choices Across Generations," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 31(2), pages 174-203, June.
    2. Ben-Halima, B. & Chusseau, N. & Hellier, J., 2014. "Skill premia and intergenerational education mobility: The French case," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 50-64.
    3. Brigitte Granville & Jaume Martorell Cruz & Martha Prevezer, 2015. "Elites, Thickets and Institutions: French Resistance versus German Adaptation to Economic Change, 1945-2015," Working Papers 63, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
    4. Viktor Steiner & Katharina Wrohlich, 2012. "Financial Student Aid and Enrollment in Higher Education: New Evidence from Germany," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(1), pages 124-147, March.
    5. Spiess, C. Katharina & Wrohlich, Katharina, 2010. "Does distance determine who attends a university in Germany?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 470-479, June.
    6. Tansel, Aysit, 2011. "Intergenerational educational mobility in Turkey," MPRA Paper 68435, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Antonio Di Paolo, 2012. "Parental Education And Family Characteristics: Educational Opportunities Across Cohorts In Italy And Spain," Revista de Economia Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Estructura Economica y Economia Publica, vol. 20(1), pages 119-146, Spring.
    8. Krause-Pilatus, Annabelle & Schüller, Simone, 2014. "Evidence and Persistence of Education Inequality in an Early-Tracking System: The German Case," IZA Discussion Papers 8545, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. B. Ben Halima & N. Chusseau & J. Hellier, 2013. "Skill Premia and Intergenerational Skill Transmission: The French Case," Working Papers 285, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    10. Ludger Wößmann, 2003. "European education production functions: what makes a difference for student achievement in Europe?," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 190, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    11. Hikaru Hasegawa & Kazuhiro Ueda, 2016. "Analysis of Job Satisfaction: The Case of Japanese Private Companies," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 30(1), pages 109-134, March.
    12. Giambona, Francesca & Porcu, Mariano, 2015. "Student background determinants of reading achievement in Italy. A quantile regression analysis," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 95-107.
    13. Agasisti, Tommaso & Cordero-Ferrera, Jose M., 2013. "Educational disparities across regions: A multilevel analysis for Italy and Spain," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 1079-1102.
    14. Frenette, Marc, 2005. "Is Post-secondary Access More Equitable in Canada or the United States?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005244e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    15. Mona Groß & Annika Herr & Martin Hower & Alexander Kuhlmann & Jörg Mahlich & Matthias Stoll, 2016. "Unemployment, health, and education of HIV-infected males in Germany," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(5), pages 593-602, June.
    16. Allen M. Featherstone & Timothy A. Park & Jeremy G. Weber, 2012. "Keeping ARMS relevant: extracting additional information from ARMS," Agricultural Finance Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 72(2), pages 233-246, July.
    17. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2016. "Intergenerational Mobility in Income and Economic Status in Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 10047, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Regina Riphahn & Florian Schieferdecker, 2012. "The transition to tertiary education and parental background over time," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 635-675, January.
    19. repec:eee:ecmode:v:71:y:2018:i:c:p:247-262 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. John V. Nye & Maksym Bryukhanov & Sergiy Polyachenko, 2016. "2d:4d and Lifetime Educational Outcomes: Evidence from the Russian RLMS Survey," HSE Working papers WP BRP 145/EC/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    21. Biewen, Martin & Tapalaga, Madalina, 2016. "Life-Cycle Educational Choices: Evidence for Two German Cohorts," IZA Discussion Papers 9699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    22. Biewen, Martin & Tapalaga, Madalina, 2017. "Life-cycle educational choices in a system with early tracking and ‘second chance’ options," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 80-94.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:10:y:2003:i:2:p:231-251. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.