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The Transition to Tertiary Education and Parental Background over Time

  • Regina Riphahn
  • Florian Schieferdecker

Using SOEP data (1984-2006) we analyze the role of parental background for transitions to tertiary education in Germany and answer three questions: (a) does the relevance of parental background shift from short-term (contemporary income) to long factors (ability, parental education) at higher levels of education? (b) Did the impact of parental background on participation in tertiary education change over time? (c) Are there different patterns by sex and region? We consider panel estimators with and without selectivity corrections and numerous robustness tests. Parental income significantly affects transitions to tertiary education. Its impact seems to have lost magnitude over time. We find no clear differences by sex, and larger parental income effects in West than in East Germany.

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File URL: http://www.bgpe.de/texte/DP/063_schieferdecker.pdf
File Function: First version, 2008
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Paper provided by Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE) in its series Working Papers with number 063.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bav:wpaper:063_schieferdecker
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.bgpe.de/

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