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Parental income, assets, borrowing constraints and children's post-secondary education

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  • Huang, Jin
  • Guo, Baorong
  • Kim, Youngmi
  • Sherraden, Michael

Abstract

This study is a test of two theoretical models linking parental economic resources to children's post-secondary education, short-term borrowing constraints, and long-term family background. A series of structural equation models (SEM) is tested using data from a sample of young adults (NÂ =Â 650) in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). To further understand the role of parental resources in children's education, analyses are conducted for both income and assets, with assets measured by liquid assets and net worth. Findings indicate that both income and assets have consistent long-term associations with children's college entry. When measures of household wealth are incorporated in the analysis, the hypothesis of short-term borrowing constraints is also supported. Implications for research and policy are considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Huang, Jin & Guo, Baorong & Kim, Youngmi & Sherraden, Michael, 2010. "Parental income, assets, borrowing constraints and children's post-secondary education," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 585-594, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:32:y:2010:i:4:p:585-594
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Friedline, Terri & Elliott, William & Nam, Ilsung, 2013. "Small-dollar children's saving accounts and children's college outcomes by race," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 548-559.
    2. repec:kap:jfamec:v:40:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1007_s10834-018-9604-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. William Elliott & Monique Constance-Huggins & Hyun-a Song, 2013. "Improving College Progress among Low- to Moderate-Income (LMI) Young Adults: The Role of Assets," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 382-399, December.
    4. Oyserman, Daphna, 2013. "Not just any path: Implications of identity-based motivation for disparities in school outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 179-190.
    5. Tumino, Alberto & Taylor, Mark P., 2015. "The impact of local labour market conditions on school leaving decisions," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-14, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Elliott, William, 2013. "The effects of economic instability on children's educational outcomes," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 461-471.
    7. Despard, Mathieu R. & Perantie, Dana & Taylor, Samuel & Grinstein-Weiss, Michal & Friedline, Terri & Raghavan, Ramesh, 2016. "Student debt and hardship: Evidence from a large sample of low- and moderate-income households," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 8-18.
    8. Huang, Jin, 2013. "Intergenerational transmission of educational attainment: The role of household assets," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 112-123.
    9. repec:eee:cysrev:v:87:y:2018:i:c:p:60-68 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Huang, Jin & Sherraden, Michael & Purnell, Jason Q., 2014. "Impacts of Child Development Accounts on maternal depressive symptoms: Evidence from a randomized statewide policy experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 30-38.
    11. Kim, Youngmi & Sherraden, Michael, 2011. "Do parental assets matter for children's educational attainment?: Evidence from mediation tests," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 969-979, June.
    12. Ansong, David & Wu, Shiyou & Chowa, Gina A.N., 2015. "The role of child and parent savings in promoting expectations for university education among middle school students in Ghana: A propensity score analysis," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 265-273.
    13. Elliott, William & Destin, Mesmin & Friedline, Terri, 2011. "Taking stock of ten years of research on the relationship between assets and children's educational outcomes: Implications for theory, policy and intervention," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 2312-2328.

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