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Do parental assets matter for children's educational attainment?: Evidence from mediation tests

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  • Kim, Youngmi
  • Sherraden, Michael

Abstract

This study investigates (1) the effects of parental assets on children's educational attainment from high school completion to college degree attainment, and (2) mediating roles played by parental involvement, child's educational expectations, and child's self-esteem. The study sample (NÂ =Â 632) is drawn from the Child and Young Adult data supplement to the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979. Results indicate that parental assets are associated with children's later educational attainment. Financial assets and home-ownership are significantly associated with high school completion and college attendance. In addition, family income becomes non-significant when specific measures of assets and liabilities are taken into account. Non-financial assets and income are significant predictors of college degree attainment. Children's educational expectations mediate the effect of financial assets on high school completion. Empirical evidence provides support for asset-building programs and policies designed to promote long-term educational attainment.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Youngmi & Sherraden, Michael, 2011. "Do parental assets matter for children's educational attainment?: Evidence from mediation tests," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 969-979, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:33:y:2011:i:6:p:969-979
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    Cited by:

    1. Loke, Vernon, 2013. "Parental asset accumulation trajectories and children's college outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 124-133.
    2. Elliott, William, 2013. "The effects of economic instability on children's educational outcomes," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 461-471.
    3. Kafle, Kashi R. & Dean, Jolliffe, 2015. "Effects of asset ownership on child health indicators and educational performance in Tanzania," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205687, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Grinstein-Weiss, Michal & Sherraden, Michael & Gale, William G. & Rohe, William M. & Schreiner, Mark & Key, Clinton, 2013. "Long-term effects of Individual Development Accounts on postsecondary education: Follow-up evidence from a randomized experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 58-68.
    5. Elliott, William & Destin, Mesmin & Friedline, Terri, 2011. "Taking stock of ten years of research on the relationship between assets and children's educational outcomes: Implications for theory, policy and intervention," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 2312-2328.
    6. Oyserman, Daphna, 2013. "Not just any path: Implications of identity-based motivation for disparities in school outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 179-190.
    7. Kafle, Kashi & Jolliffe, Dean & Winter-Nelson, Alex, 2016. "Effects of household asset holdings on child educational performance: Evidence from Tanzania," 2016 Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 249273, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    8. Huang, Jin & Sherraden, Michael & Purnell, Jason Q., 2014. "Impacts of Child Development Accounts on maternal depressive symptoms: Evidence from a randomized statewide policy experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 30-38.
    9. Huang, Jin, 2013. "Intergenerational transmission of educational attainment: The role of household assets," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 112-123.
    10. repec:eee:cysrev:v:87:y:2018:i:c:p:60-68 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Chowa, Gina A.N. & Masa, Rainier D. & Tucker, Jenna, 2013. "The effects of parental involvement on academic performance of Ghanaian youth: Testing measurement and relationships using structural equation modeling," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 2020-2030.
    12. repec:kap:jfamec:v:38:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10834-016-9517-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Caroliniana S. Padgett & R. Corey Remle, 2016. "Financial Assistance Patterns from Midlife Parents to Adult Children: A Test of the Cumulative Advantage Hypothesis," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 435-449, September.
    14. repec:eee:wdevel:v:109:y:2018:i:c:p:14-28 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Marta Barazzetta & Andrew E. Clark & Conchita D'Ambrosio, 2017. "Childhood Circumstances and Young Adulthood Outcomes: The Effects of Mothers' Financial Problems," PSE Working Papers halshs-01622334, HAL.
    16. repec:eee:cysrev:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:20-28 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Ansong, David & Wu, Shiyou & Chowa, Gina A.N., 2015. "The role of child and parent savings in promoting expectations for university education among middle school students in Ghana: A propensity score analysis," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 265-273.
    18. Kafle, Kashi & Jolliffe, Dean & Winter-Nelson, Alex, 2018. "Do different types of assets have differential effects on child education? Evidence from Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 14-28.
    19. Stefanie Mollborn & Elizabeth Lawrence & Laurie James-Hawkins & Paula Fomby, 2014. "How Resource Dynamics Explain Accumulating Developmental and Health Disparities for Teen Parents’ Children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(4), pages 1199-1224, August.

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