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Intergenerational transmission of educational attainment: The role of household assets

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  • Huang, Jin

Abstract

High intergenerational persistence of educational attainment is an indicator of educational inequality and a barrier to equal opportunities in the labor market and beyond. This study uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to generate a sample of two cohorts of children (’84 and &94 cohorts), and it examines whether intergenerational transmission of educational attainment varies by household economic resources, especially household assets. Results show that, among male children in the &94 cohort, household assets increase the strength of the association between parents’ and children's years of schooling. Also, household assets are found to interact with parental education to affect educational attainment, as measured by college completion, among female children in the &94 cohort. Research and policy implications are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Huang, Jin, 2013. "Intergenerational transmission of educational attainment: The role of household assets," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 112-123.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:33:y:2013:i:c:p:112-123
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2012.09.013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Björklund, Anders & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2011. "Education and Family Background: Mechanisms and Policies," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
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    7. Martha J. Bailey & Susan M. Dynarski, 2011. "Gains and Gaps: Changing Inequality in U.S. College Entry and Completion," NBER Working Papers 17633, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Hertz Tom & Jayasundera Tamara & Piraino Patrizio & Selcuk Sibel & Smith Nicole & Verashchagina Alina, 2008. "The Inheritance of Educational Inequality: International Comparisons and Fifty-Year Trends," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-48, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nohora Forero-Ramírez & Floor E. W. Knoote & Sofía Ortega-Tíneo, 2015. "Children and the Financial Regulatory Landscape in Latin America," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 013813, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    2. Kafle, Kashi & Jolliffe, Dean & Winter-Nelson, Alex, 2018. "Do different types of assets have differential effects on child education? Evidence from Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 14-28.
    3. Elliott, William & Sherraden, Michael, 2013. "Assets and educational achievement: Theory and evidence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 1-7.
    4. Kroeger, Sarah & Thompson, Owen, 2016. "Educational mobility across three generations of American women," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 72-86.
    5. Pastore, Francesco & Roccisano, Federica, 2015. "The Inheritance of Educational Inequality among Young People in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 9065, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Liu, Ling & Wan, Qian, 2017. "The Effect of Education Expansion on Intergenerational Mobility of Education: Evidence from China," MPRA Paper 80616, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Mussa, Richard, 2017. "Early-Life Rainfall Shocks and Intergenerational Education Mobility in Malawi," MPRA Paper 75978, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1421-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Kafle, Kashi R. & Dean, Jolliffe, 2015. "Effects of asset ownership on child health indicators and educational performance in Tanzania," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205687, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. repec:spr:chinre:v:11:y:2018:i:6:d:10.1007_s12187-017-9525-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Kafle, Kashi & Jolliffe, Dean & Winter-Nelson, Alex, 2016. "Effects of household asset holdings on child educational performance: Evidence from Tanzania," 2016 Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 249273, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic impact; Human capital; Educational economics;

    JEL classification:

    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

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