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Educational mobility across three generations of American women

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  • Kroeger, Sarah
  • Thompson, Owen

Abstract

We analyze the intergenerational transmission of education in a three-generation sample of women from the 20th century US. We find strong three-generation educational persistence, with the association between the education of grandmothers and their granddaughters approximately two times stronger than would be expected under the type of first-order autoregressive transmission structure that has been assumed in much of the existing two-generation mobility literature. These findings are robust to using alternative empirical specifications and sample constructions, and are successfully replicated in a second independently drawn data set. Analyses that include males in the youngest and oldest generations produce very similar estimates. A variety of potential mechanisms linking the educational outcomes of grandparents and grandchildren are discussed and where possible tested empirically.

Suggested Citation

  • Kroeger, Sarah & Thompson, Owen, 2016. "Educational mobility across three generations of American women," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 72-86.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:53:y:2016:i:c:p:72-86
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2016.05.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "Multigenerational persistence. Evidence from 146 years of administrative data," Discussion Papers 850, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. repec:eee:exehis:v:70:y:2018:i:c:p:73-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Olivetti, Claudia & Paserman, M. Daniele & Salisbury, Laura, 2018. "Three-generation mobility in the United States, 1850–1940: The role of maternal and paternal grandparents," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 73-90.
    4. Colagrossi, Marco & d'Hombres, Beatrice & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2019. "Like (Grand)Parent, like Child? Multigenerational Mobility across the EU," IZA Discussion Papers 12302, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. A. Hector Moreno M., 2018. "Good things come in threes: multigenerational transmission of human capital," PSE Working Papers halshs-01945784, HAL.

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    Keywords

    Mobility; Education Trends; Gender;

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