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Three-generation educational mobility in six African countries

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Razzu

    (Department of Economics, University of Reading)

  • Ayago Wambile

    (The World Bank)

Abstract

Using nationally representative survey data, we provide estimates of three generation educational mobility for six African countries: Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria and Tanzania. We ask whether the extent of educational mobility across three generations differ by gender and whether the impact of grandparents differ depending on their residence status. We find that grandparents matter and the intergenerational effects can persist beyond two generations. These effects are however one fifth of those between two generations. They are generally higher for daughters than sons and stronger if grandparents live with their grandchildren than if they do not.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Razzu & Ayago Wambile, 2020. "Three-generation educational mobility in six African countries," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-23, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  • Handle: RePEc:rdg:emxxdp:em-dp2020-23
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    File URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/files/economics/emdp202023.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    multigenerational social mobility; education; gender; methods;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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