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Labour market returns to higher education in Vietnam

  • Doan, Tinh
  • Stevens, Philip

This paper employs the Ordinary Least Squares, Instrumental Variables and Treatment Effect models to a new dataset from the Vietnam Household Living Standards Survey (VHLSS) to estimate return to four-year university education in 2008. Our estimates reveal that income premium of four-year university education is about 97 percent above that of high school education, and robust to the various estimators.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.5018/economics-ejournal.ja.2011-12
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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/49714/1/667988408.pdf
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Article provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its journal Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal.

Volume (Year): 5 (2011)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 1-21

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Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifweej:201112
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