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The Role of Private Sector in Education in Vietnam. Evidence from the Vietnam Living Standards Survey

Author

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  • Glewwe, P.
  • Patrinos, H.A.

Abstract

As part of the restructuring of the education system since doi moi or Renovation in 1989, the government of Vietnam has implemented several policy changes. These include transforming some public institutions into private ones, promoting the establishment of "people's" and community educational institutions, and permitting the establishment of private institutions. Since the move from a centrally planned economy to a market economy is recent, it is not surprising that private schools are relatively rare in Vietnam.

Suggested Citation

  • Glewwe, P. & Patrinos, H.A., 1998. "The Role of Private Sector in Education in Vietnam. Evidence from the Vietnam Living Standards Survey," Papers 132, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:wobali:132
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    Cited by:

    1. Doan, Tinh & Stevens, Philip, 2011. "Labour market returns to higher education in Vietnam," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 5, pages 1-21.
    2. Vu, Tien Manh & Yamada, Hiroyuki, 2020. "Impacts of enterprise zones on local households in Vietnam," AGI Working Paper Series 2020-10, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    3. World Bank, 2012. "Well Begun, Not Yet Done : Vietnam's Remarkable Progress on Poverty Reduction and the Emerging Challenges," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12326, The World Bank.
    4. Bui, Tuan Anh & Nguyen, Cuong Viet & Nguyen, Khuong Duc & Nguyen, Ha Hong & Pham, Phuong Thu, 2020. "The effect of tuition fee reduction and education subsidy on school enrollment: Evidence from Vietnam," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C).
    5. Jean-Louis ARCAND & Béatrice D'HOMBRES & Paul GYSELINCK, 2004. "Instrument Choice and the Returns to Education: New Evidence from Vietnam," Working Papers 200422, CERDI.
    6. Pablo González, 2002. "Lecciones de la investigación económica sobre el rol del sector privado en educación," Documentos de Trabajo 117, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    7. Tinh Doan & Quan Le & Tuyen Quang Tran, 2018. "Lost in Transition? Declining Returns to Education in Vietnam," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 30(2), pages 195-216, April.
    8. Omoeva, Carina & Gale, Charles, 2016. "Universal, but not free: Household schooling costs and equity effects of Uganda’s Universal Secondary Education policy," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 41-50.
    9. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2009. "Determinants of schooling for boys and girls in Nigeria under a policy of free primary education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 474-484, August.
    10. Glenn P. Jenkins & Hope Amala Anyabolu & Pejman Bahramian, 2019. "Family decision-making for educational expenditure: new evidence from survey data for Nigeria," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(52), pages 5663-5673, November.
    11. Liu, Amy Y.C., 2008. "Changes in urban inequality in Vietnam: 1992-1998," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 410-425, December.
    12. Acar, Elif Öznur & Günalp, Burak & Cilasun, Seyit Mümin, 2016. "An empirical analysis of household education expenditures in Turkey," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 23-35.
    13. Hai-Anh H. Dang & Paul W. Glewwe, 2018. "Well Begun, but Aiming Higher: A Review of Vietnam’s Education Trends in the past 20 Years and Emerging Challenges," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(7), pages 1171-1195, July.
    14. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2012. "The influence of price on school enrollment under Uganda's policy of free primary education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 799-811.
    15. Daeheon Choi & Chune Young Chung & Ha Truong, 2019. "Return on Education in Two Major Vietnamese Cities," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(18), pages 1-30, September.
    16. Xu, Lixin Colin & Zhang, Jing, 2014. "Water quality, brawn, and education: the rural drinking water program in China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7054, The World Bank.
    17. Vu, Tien Manh & Yamada, Hiroyuki, 2020. "Impacts of enterprise zones on local households in Vietnam," AGI Working Paper Series 2020-10, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    18. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2015. "Improving Identification of Demand-Side Obstacles to Schooling: Findings from Revealed and Stated Preference Models in Two SSA Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 69-83.
    19. Gutknecht, Daniel, 2011. "Nonclassical Measurement Error in a Nonlinear (Duration) Model," Economic Research Papers 270763, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    20. Abdul Malik Iddrisu & Michael Danquah & Alfred Barimah & Williams Ohemeng, 2020. "Gender, age cohort, and household investment in child schooling: New evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp2020-9, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    21. Anne Goujon & Samir K.C., 2009. "Past and Future of Human Capital in Southeast Asia: From 1970 to 2030," VID Working Papers 0607, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.
    22. Iddrisu, Abdul Malik & Danquah, Michael & Quartey, Peter & Ohemeng, Williams, 2018. "Gender bias in households’ educational expenditures: Does the stage of schooling matter?," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 10, pages 15-23.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    EDUCATION ; VIET NAM ; PRIVATE SECTOR;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • P31 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Socialist Enterprises and Their Transitions

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