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What Determines Upper Secondary School Participation? - Intergenerational Effects Of Education Outcomes In Albania

Author

Listed:
  • Elvana Hana

    (Albanian Institute of Health Insurance)

  • Arsena Gjipali

    (Faculty of Business and Economics)

Abstract

Educational attainment is considered an intergenerational transmission mechanism. The link between schooling of children and their parents could be due to unobserved inherited characteristics, and/or, through the additional household income associated with higher levels of education or parental support. We empirically observe the choice of young Albanians 15 to 18 years old whether or not to enrol in school through a Probit model using cross section data from LSMS 2002. A number of policy issues are addressed. First, we can identify which teenagers are more likely to enter post-compulsory schooling. Second, we can examine to what extent parents' background affect decisions of their children to enter upper secondary education, and what is the role of the schooling system in reducing or magnifying such relationships. Drawing on these findings, our analysis concludes with the development of policy recommendations to target the movement towards higher participation in upper secondary school.

Suggested Citation

  • Elvana Hana & Arsena Gjipali, 2010. "What Determines Upper Secondary School Participation? - Intergenerational Effects Of Education Outcomes In Albania," Journal Articles, Center For Economic Analyses, pages 17-31, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cmk:journl:y:2010:p:17-31
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    References listed on IDEAS

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