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Mothers, fathers and daughters: Intergenerational transmission of education in Greece

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  • Daouli, Joan
  • Demoussis, Michael
  • Giannakopoulos, Nicholas

Abstract

This study explores the role of intergenerational mobility in the educational attainments of Greek women. We use data from the most recent Greek Household Budget Survey and the last three Greek censuses (1981, 1991 and 2001). For analytical and estimation purposes we utilize mobility indicators, regression analysis, decomposition techniques and conventional discrete choice models. Overall, our results point to the presence of substantial educational mobility across generations over the last 30 years. However, daughters' educational attainment still depends, albeit to a lesser extent, on parental education and especially on mothers' education. To address the remaining inequalities, policy needs to target families with poor parental educational and income backgrounds.

Suggested Citation

  • Daouli, Joan & Demoussis, Michael & Giannakopoulos, Nicholas, 2010. "Mothers, fathers and daughters: Intergenerational transmission of education in Greece," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 83-93, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:1:p:83-93
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