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Online Appendix to "The Welfare and Distributional Effects of Fiscal Volatility: a Quantitative Evaluation"

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  • Ruediger Bachmann

    (Notre Dame University)

  • Jinhui Bai

    (Boston College)

  • Minjoon Lee

    (Carleton University)

  • Fudong Zhang

    (Tsinghua University)

Abstract

Online appendix for the Review of Economic Dynamics article

Suggested Citation

  • Ruediger Bachmann & Jinhui Bai & Minjoon Lee & Fudong Zhang, 2020. "Online Appendix to "The Welfare and Distributional Effects of Fiscal Volatility: a Quantitative Evaluation"," Online Appendices 18-207, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:append:18-207
    Note: The original article was published in the Review of Economic Dynamics
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    File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/appendix/18/18-207/RED__BBLZ_Appendix.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Röhrs, Sigrid & Winter, Christoph, 2017. "Reducing government debt in the presence of inequality," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 1-20.
    2. Gerald Carlino & Nicholas Zarra & Robert Inman & Thorsten Drautzburg, 2019. "Fiscal Policy in Monetary Unions: State Partisanship and its Macroeconomic Effects," 2019 Meeting Papers 434, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Lorenzo Bretscher & Alex Hsu & Andrea Tamoni, 2017. "Level and Volatility Shocks to Fiscal Policy: Term Structure Implications," 2017 Meeting Papers 258, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Hikaru Saijo, 2020. "Redistribution And Fiscal Uncertainty Shocks," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 61(3), pages 1073-1095, August.
    5. Hikaru Saijo, 2018. "Redistribution and Fiscal Uncertainty Shocks," IMES Discussion Paper Series 18-E-15, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    6. Paweł Kopiec, 2022. "The Aggregate and Distributional Effects of Fiscal Stimuli," Working Papers 2022-070, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis.
    7. Laura E. Jackson & Christopher Otrok & Michael T. Owyang, 2019. "Tax Progressivity, Economic Booms, and Trickle-Up Economics," Working Papers 2019-034, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 06 Jun 2022.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H30 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - General

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