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Innocent Bystanders? Monetary policy and inequality

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  • Coibion, Olivier
  • Gorodnichenko, Yuriy
  • Kueng, Lorenz
  • Silvia, John

Abstract

We study the effects of monetary policy shocks on—and their historical contribution to—consumption and income inequality in the United States since 1980 as measured by the Consumer Expenditure Survey. Contractionary monetary policy systematically increases inequality in labor earnings, total income, consumption and total expenditures. Furthermore, monetary policy shocks account for a non-trivial component of the historical cyclical variation in income and consumption inequality. Using detailed micro-level data on income and consumption, we document some of the different channels via which monetary policy shocks affect inequality, as well as how these channels depend on the nature of the change in monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Coibion, Olivier & Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Kueng, Lorenz & Silvia, John, 2017. "Innocent Bystanders? Monetary policy and inequality," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 70-89.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:88:y:2017:i:c:p:70-89
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2017.05.005
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