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Productivity, Taxes, and Hours Worked in Spain: 1970–2015

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  • Juan Carlos Conesa
  • Timothy J. Kehoe

Abstract

In the early 1970s, hours worked per working-age person in Spain were higher than in the United States. Starting in 1975, however, hours worked in Spain fell by 40 percent. We find that 80 percent of the decline in hours worked can be accounted for by the evolution of taxes in an otherwise standard neoclassical growth model. Although taxes play a crucial role, we cannot argue that taxes drive all of the movements in hours worked. In particular, the model underpredicts the large decrease in hours in 1975–1986 and the large increase in hours in 1994–2007. The lack of productivity growth in Spain during 1994–2015 has little impact on the model’s prediction for hours worked.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Carlos Conesa & Timothy J. Kehoe, 2017. "Productivity, Taxes, and Hours Worked in Spain: 1970–2015," NBER Working Papers 23592, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23592
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    Cited by:

    1. Manuel García-Santana & Enrique Moral-Benito & Josep Pijoan-Mas & Roberto Ramos, 2016. "Growing like Spain: 1995-2007," Economics Working Papers 1517, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    2. Enrique Moral-Benito, 2018. "Growing by learning: firm-level evidence on the size-productivity nexus," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 65-90, March.
    3. Juan Carlos Conesa & Pau S. Pujolas, 2019. "The Canadian productivity stagnation, 20022014," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 52(2), pages 561-583, May.
    4. Agnani, Betty & Iza Padilla, María Amaya, 2005. "Growth in an oil abundant economy: The case of Venezuela," DFAEII Working Papers 2005-15, University of the Basque Country - Department of Foundations of Economic Analysis II.
    5. Cruz A. Echevarría & Amaia Iza, 2011. "Social security, education retirement and growth," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 198(3), pages 9-36, September.
    6. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Sara de la Rica, 2008. "Does Immigration Raise Natives’ Income? National and Regional Evidence from Spain," Working Papers 2008-17, FEDEA.
    7. Roberto Ellery Jr. & Victor Gomes, 2014. "Fiscal Policy, Supply Shocks and Economic Expansion in Brazil from 2003 to 2007," Brazilian Business Review, Fucape Business School, vol. 11(3), pages 53-75, June.
    8. Çiçek, Deniz & Elgin, Ceyhun, 2011. "Not-quite-great depressions of Turkey: A quantitative analysis of economic growth over 1968–2004," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2691-2700.
    9. Pablo D'Erasmo & Enrique Mendoza, 2011. "Optimal Domestic (and External) Sovereign Default," PIER Working Paper Archive 16-019, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 04 Aug 2016.
    10. Duernecker, Georg & Herrendorf, Berthold, 2018. "On the allocation of time – A quantitative analysis of the roles of taxes and productivities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 169-187.
    11. Díaz, Antonia & Franjo, Luis, 2016. "Capital goods, measured TFP and growth: The case of Spain," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 19-39.
    12. Nezih Guner, 2017. "Introduction to the special issue on the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC)," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 311-314, November.
    13. Cheuk Yin Ho, 2007. "Illegal migration and economic growth: simulation analysis in an international context," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 6(41), pages 1-13.
    14. Jose Emilio Boscá & Rafael Domenech & Javier Ferri, 2008. "Tax Reforms and Labour-market Performance: An Evaluation for Spain using REMS," Working Papers 0804, International Economics Institute, University of Valencia.
    15. Dalton, John, 2012. "The Evolution of Taxes and Hours Worked in Austria, 1970-2005," MPRA Paper 48222, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Stylianos G. Gogos & Dimitris Papageorgiou & Vanghelis Vassilatos, 2018. "Rent seeking activities and aggregate economic performance - the case of Greece," Working Papers 252, Bank of Greece.
    17. Jesús Rodríguez López & Mario Solís-García, 2012. "Accounting Spanish business cycles: What can be learned from past recessions?," Working Papers 12.05, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household

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