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Social security, education retirement and growth


  • Cruz A. Echevarría

    () (Universidad del País Vasco)

  • Amaia Iza

    () (Universidad del País Vasco)


This paper analyzes, firstly, the expected effects of social security reforms that have been implemented in Spain after 2004 (and, secondly, the expected effects of reductions in the minimum pension) on retirement decision and human capital accumulation (and hence on growth and on income inequality). Individuals in our model economy differ in their innate ability and growth is a by-product of the most skilled individuals’ productivity. According to our model, i) increases in the minimum and normal retirement ages are expected to have a strong effect, not only on individuals’ retirement decisions, but also on their education investment; ii) augmented incentives to late retirement are not expected to have any effect; iii) reductions in the minimum pension are not expected to have a significant effect unless it is completely eliminated.

Suggested Citation

  • Cruz A. Echevarría & Amaia Iza, 2011. "Social security, education retirement and growth," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 198(3), pages 9-36, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:hpe:journl:y:2011:v:198:i:3:p:9-36

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mehra, Rajnish & Prescott, Edward C., 1985. "The equity premium: A puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 145-161, March.
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    8. Juan Carlos Conesa & Carlos Garriga, 2001. "Sistema Fiscal y Reforma de la Seguridad Social," Working Papers in Economics 67, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
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    13. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Selahattin Imrohoroglu & Krishna B. Kumar, 2003. "Growth and Welfare Analysis of Tax Progressivity in a Heterogeneous-Agent Model," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 6(3), pages 546-577, July.
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    More about this item


    Social Security; Pay-as-you-go; Voluntary Retirement; Human Capital; Minimum Pen;

    JEL classification:

    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents


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