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Education, Social Security and Growth

Author

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  • Kaganovich, M
  • Zilcha, I

Abstract

The desirability of Government intervention in the functioning of a competitive economy arises in cases where the attained competitive equilibria are inefficient or fail to achieve certain important social goals. In the twentieth century, we witnessed a worldwide phenomena of intervention by governments in the provision of education and social security. In most countries it is not only that a certain level of education is mandatory and is provided by the government but also the higher education is heavily subsidized.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaganovich, M & Zilcha, I, 1997. "Education, Social Security and Growth," Papers 1-97, Tel Aviv.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:teavfo:1-97
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    EDUCATION ; SOCIAL SECURITY ; ECONOMIC GROWTH ; GOVERNMENT POLICY;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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