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Effects of public education and social security on fertility

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  • Tatsuya Omori

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  • Tatsuya Omori, 2009. "Effects of public education and social security on fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(3), pages 585-601, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:22:y:2009:i:3:p:585-601
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-009-0244-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William G. Gale & John Karl Scholz, 1994. "Intergenerational Transfers and the Accumulation of Wealth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 145-160, Fall.
    2. Helmuth Cremer & Firouz Gahvari & Pierre Pestieau, 2008. "Pensions with heterogenous individuals and endogenous fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(4), pages 961-981, October.
    3. Kaganovich, Michael & Zilcha, Itzhak, 1999. "Education, social security, and growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 289-309, February.
    4. Barro, Robert J & Becker, Gary S, 1989. "Fertility Choice in a Model of Economic Growth," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 481-501, March.
    5. Zhang, Jie & Zhang, Junsen, 2007. "Optimal social security in a dynastic model with investment externalities and endogenous fertility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(11), pages 3545-3567, November.
    6. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education, Third Edition, pages 257-298, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka & Phillip Swagel, 2002. "The Aging Population and the Size of the Welfare State," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(4), pages 900-918, August.
    8. Tabata, Ken, 2003. "Inverted U-shaped fertility dynamics, the poverty trap and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 241-248, November.
    9. Gary S. Becker & Robert J. Barro, 1988. "A Reformulation of the Economic Theory of Fertility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(1), pages 1-25.
    10. Morand, Olivier F, 1999. "Endogenous Fertility, Income Distribution, and Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 331-349, September.
    11. Glomm, Gerhard & Kaganovich, Michael, 2008. "Social security, public education and the growth-inequality relationship," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(6), pages 1009-1034, August.
    12. Eckstein, Zvi & Stern, Steven & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1988. "Fertility Choice, Land, and the Malthusian Hypothesis," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 29(2), pages 353-361, May.
    13. Akira Yakita, 2001. "Uncertain lifetime, fertility and social security," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(4), pages 635-640.
    14. Kelvin R. Utendorf & Rowena A. Pecchenino, 1999. "Social security, social welfare and the aging population," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 607-623.
    15. Gerhard Glomm & Michael Kaganovich, 2003. "Distributional Effects of Public Education in an Economy with Public Pensions," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(3), pages 917-937, August.
    16. Patricia Apps & Ray Rees, 2004. "Fertility, Taxation and Family Policy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(4), pages 745-763, December.
    17. Jie Zhang & Junsen Zhang, 2004. "How does social security affect economic growth? Evidence from cross-country data," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(3), pages 473-500, August.
    18. van Groezen, Bas & Leers, Theo & Meijdam, Lex, 2003. "Social security and endogenous fertility: pensions and child allowances as siamese twins," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 233-251, February.
    19. Yew, Siew Ling & Zhang, Jie, 2009. "Optimal social security in a dynastic model with human capital externalities, fertility and endogenous growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(3-4), pages 605-619, April.
    20. Zhang, Jie & Zhang, Junsen, 2003. "Long-run effects of unfunded social security with earnings-dependent benefits," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 617-641, December.
    21. Junsen Zhang & Junxi Zhang, 1998. "Social Security, Intergenerational Transfers, and Endogenous Growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(5), pages 1225-1241, November.
    22. Ehrlich, Isaac & Zhong, Jian-Guo, 1998. "Social Security and the Real Economy: An Inquiry into Some Neglected Issues," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 151-157, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ratbek Dzhumashev & Ainura Tursunalieva, 2016. ""Keeping up with the Joneses" and fertility choice," Monash Economics Working Papers 30-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2011. "Extended Schooling and Internalized Training: Skill Elements Evolution of Blue-collar Workers in an Internal Labor Market," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f157, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised Aug 2012.
    3. Watanabe, Minoru & Miyake, Yusuke & Yasuoka, Masaya, 2018. "Unemployment, Income Growth and Social Security," MPRA Paper 86155, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Tohru Naito & Tatsuya Omori, 2016. "Household's disaster prevention activities, agglomeration and economic growth," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(4), pages 177-195, November.
    5. Tohru Naito & Tatsuya Omori, 2014. "Can urban pollution shrink rural districts?," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 73-83, July.
    6. Marek Loužek, 2010. "Mikroekonomické základy reprodukčního rozhodování [Microeconomic Foundations of Reproductive Behaviour]," Politická ekonomie, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2010(3), pages 374-391.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child care cost; Social security; Fertility decision; H52; H55; J13;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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