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Optimal social security in a dynastic model with human capital externalities, fertility and endogenous growth

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  • Yew, Siew Ling
  • Zhang, Jie

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the optimal scale of pay-as-you-go social security in a dynastic family model with human capital externalities, fertility and endogenous growth. Human capital externalities reduce the return to human capital investment and hence lead to under-investment in human capital and over-reproduction of the population. If the taste for the number of children is sufficiently weak relative to the taste for the welfare of children, social security can be welfare enhancing by reducing fertility and raising human capital investment per child.

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  • Yew, Siew Ling & Zhang, Jie, 2009. "Optimal social security in a dynastic model with human capital externalities, fertility and endogenous growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(3-4), pages 605-619, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:93:y:2009:i:3-4:p:605-619
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tatsuya Omori, 2009. "Effects of public education and social security on fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(3), pages 585-601, July.
    2. Coeurdacier, Nicolas & Guibaud, Stéphane & Jin, Keyu, 2014. "Fertility policies and social security reforms in China," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66107, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Barnett, Richard & Bhattacharya, Joydeep & Puhakka, Mikko, 2012. "Private Versus Public Old-Age Security," School of Economics Working Paper Series 2012-14, LeBow College of Business, Drexel University.
    4. Del Rey, Elena & Lopez-Garcia, Miguel-Angel, 2016. "Endogenous growth and welfare effects of education subsidies and intergenerational transfers," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 531-539.
    5. Akira Momota & Ryo Horii, 2013. "Timing of childbirth, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 494-522, April.
    6. Spataro, Luca & Renström, Thomas I., 2012. "Optimal taxation, critical-level utilitarianism and economic growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(9-10), pages 727-738.
    7. repec:cje:issued:v:51:y:2018:i:1:p:186-215 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:ekz:ekonoz:2017106 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Yang Zaigui, 2012. "Urban Public Pension and Economic Growth in China," Asia-Pacific Journal of Risk and Insurance, De Gruyter, vol. 6(2), pages 1-16, June.
    10. George Economides & Hyun Park & Apostolis Philippopoulos & Stelios Sakkas, 2015. "On the Composition of Public Spending and Taxes," CESifo Working Paper Series 5510, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Thomas Renstrom & Luca Spataro, 2015. "An analysis on optimal taxation and on policy changes in an endogenous growth model with public expenditure," Public Finance Research Papers 12, Istituto di Economia e Finanza, DIGEF, Sapienza University of Rome.
    12. Yew, Siew Ling & Zhang, Jie, 2013. "Socially optimal social security and education subsidization in a dynastic model with human capital externalities, fertility and endogenous growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 154-175.

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