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"Are the Japanese Selfish, Altruistic, or Dynastic?" (in Japanese)


  • Charlet Yuji Horioka

    (ISER, Osaka University)


In this paper, I analyze a variety of data for Japan and, where available, for the United States on bequest practices, on the importance and nature of bequest motives, on bequest division, and on the willingness of individuals to help others and survey a variety of econometric analyses in order to determine which theoretical model of household behavior applies in the two countries. My results suggest that all three models (the life cycle, altruism, and dynasty models) coexist in both countries, that the selfish life cycle model is the most applicable model in both countries but that it is far more applicable in Japan than it is in the U.S., that the dynasty model is also more applicable in Japan than it is in the U.S. but that it is not of dominant importance even in Japan, and conversely, that the altruism model is far more applicable in the U.S. than it is in Japan. In the concluding section of the paper, I consider the policy implications of my findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Charlet Yuji Horioka, 2002. ""Are the Japanese Selfish, Altruistic, or Dynastic?" (in Japanese)," CIRJE J-Series CIRJE-J-70, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tky:jseres:2002cj70

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Emine G├╝rgen & Thomas A. Wolf, 2000. "Improving Governance and Fighting Corruption in the Baltic and CIS Countries; The Role of the IMF," IMF Working Papers 00/1, International Monetary Fund.
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    5. Ruggerone, Luigi, 1996. "Unemployment and Inflationary Finance Dynamics at the Early Stages of Transition," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(435), pages 483-494, March.
    6. repec:hrv:faseco:30723290 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Shang-Jin Wei, 1997. "Gradualism versus Big Bang: Speed and Sustainability of Reforms," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 1234-1247, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Yuji HORIOKA & Wataru SUZUKI & Tatsuo HATTA, 2007. "Aging, Savings, and Public Pensions in Japan," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 2(2), pages 303-319.
    2. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama & Sayaka Nakamura, 2015. "Reciprocity in the Formation of Intergenerational Coresidence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 192-209, June.
    3. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2016. "Are the Japanese Unique? Evidence from Household Saving and Bequest Behavior," ISER Discussion Paper 0973, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    4. Charles Yuji Horioka & Emin Gahramanov & Aziz Hayat & Xueli Tang, 2016. "Why Do Children Take Care of Their Elderly Parents? Are the Japanese Any Different?," ISER Discussion Paper 0970, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    5. Yoshitaka Koda & Manachaya Uruyos, 2015. "Altruism and four shades of family relationships," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 5(2), pages 345-365, December.
    6. repec:bla:ausecp:v:56:y:2017:i:1:p:3-26 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Tien Manh Vu & Hisakazu Matsushige, 2016. "Gender, Sibling Order, and Differences in the Quantity and Quality of Education: Evidence from Japanese Twins," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 147-170, June.
    8. Charles Horioka, 2014. "Are Americans and Indians more altruistic than the Japanese and Chinese? Evidence from a new international survey of bequest plans," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 411-437, September.
    9. Ramon L. Clarete & Ernesto M. Pernia & Ammielou Gaduena & Adrian Mendoza, 2014. "The Role of Science, Technology and Research in Economic Development," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201407, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    10. HAMAAKI Junya & HORI Masahiro & MURATA Keiko, 2016. "The Intra-Family Division of Bequests and Bequest Motives: Empirical Evidence from a Survey on Japanese Households," ESRI Discussion paper series 333, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    11. Campbell, David W., 2004. "Explaining Japan's saving rate," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 797-815, August.
    12. Vipul Bhatt & Masao Ogaki, 2012. "Tough Love And Intergenerational Altruism," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 53(3), pages 791-814, August.
    13. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2014. "Why Do People Leave Bequests? For Love or Self-Interest? Evidence from a New International Survey of Bequest Plans," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201406, University of the Philippines School of Economics.

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