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Child-care Policies and Pension in an Endogenous Fertility Model

  • Masaya Yasuoka

    ()

    (School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University)

Some economically developed countries are suffering from an aging society with fewer children, which has brought about greater burdens imposed by social security. A child allowance and child-care services are provided by the governments in these countries to raise fertility. An increase in fertility pulls up the future labor population. An increase in labor population can subsequently provide sufficient social security benefits in terms of pensions and other transfers. This paper presents consideration of three child-care policies. The first is child allowances. The second is a subsidy for child-care services. The third is a subsidy for child care in the home. These three policies can raise fertility and the future labor population. This paper presents results of a derivation showing that child allowances can raise both the demand for child-care services and child care in the home. Therefore, fertility can always rise. However, a decrease in labor supply time has the effect of reducing the pension benefit. With large substitution between child-care services and child care in the home, the subsidy for child-care services or child care in the home can reduce fertility. Then, the pension benefit can not always increase.

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File URL: http://192.218.163.163/RePEc/pdf/kgdp114.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
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Paper provided by School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University in its series Discussion Paper Series with number 114.

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Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2014
Date of revision: Jan 2014
Handle: RePEc:kgu:wpaper:114
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  1. Namkee Ahn & Pedro Mira, . "A note on the changing relationship between fertility and female employment rates in developed countries," Studies on the Spanish Economy 13, FEDEA.
  2. Takashi Oshio & Masaya Yasuoka, 2009. "Maximum size of social security in a model of endogenous fertility," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(2), pages 644-654.
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  6. van Groezen, Bas & Leers, Theo & Meijdam, Lex, 2003. "Social security and endogenous fertility: pensions and child allowances as siamese twins," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 233-251, February.
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  10. Momota, Michiko, 2000. "The gender gap, fertility, subsidies and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 401-405, December.
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  12. Bas van Groezen & L. Meijdam, 2004. "Growing Old and Staying Young: Population Policy in an Ageing Closed Economy," Working Papers 04-28, Utrecht School of Economics.
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  16. Makoto Hirazawa & Akira Yakita, 2009. "Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social security," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 565-583, July.
  17. Shuanglin Lin & Xiaowen Tian, 2003. "Population growth and social security financing," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 91-110, 02.
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