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Public Education and Child-Care Policies with Pay-As-You-Go Pension

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  • Miyake, Atsushi
  • Yasuoka, Masaya

Abstract

This paper presents consideration of the effects of child allowances and subsidies for private education investment on fertility and private education investment. The level of public education expenditure plays an important role in the effects of child care policies. To raise fertility, although child allowances are effective in an economy with low public education investment, subsidies for education investment are effective in an economy for which public education investment is high. The results presented in this paper are helpful for reconciling the conflicting results reported from previous studies. In addition, this paper presents an examination of the effects of those child care policies on pension benefits. A subsidy for private education can raise both fertility and pension benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • Miyake, Atsushi & Yasuoka, Masaya, 2016. "Public Education and Child-Care Policies with Pay-As-You-Go Pension," MPRA Paper 75315, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:75315
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yasuoka, Masaya & Goto, Naohisa, 2011. "Pension and child care policies with endogenous fertility," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2478-2482.
    2. Masaya Yasuoka & Atsushi Miyake, 2014. "Fertility rate and child care policies in a pension system æ," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 122-127.
    3. Patricia Apps & Ray Rees, 2004. "Fertility, Taxation and Family Policy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(4), pages 745-763, December.
    4. de la Croix, David & Doepke, Matthias, 2004. "Public versus private education when differential fertility matters," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 607-629, April.
    5. Dolores Ferrero Martínez & Amaia Iza, 2004. "Skill premium effects on fertility and female labor force supply," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 1-16, February.
    6. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-834, August.
    7. van Groezen, Bas & Leers, Theo & Meijdam, Lex, 2003. "Social security and endogenous fertility: pensions and child allowances as siamese twins," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 233-251, February.
    8. Gary S. Becker, 1960. "An Economic Analysis of Fertility," NBER Chapters, in: Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries, pages 209-240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Fanti, Luciano & Gori, Luca, 2011. "Child policy ineffectiveness in an overlapping generations small open economy with human capital accumulation and public education," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 404-409.
    10. Chen, Hung-Ju, 2015. "Child allowances, educational subsidies and occupational choice," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 327-342.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Child allowance; Subsidy for education investment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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