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Pension and child care policies with endogenous fertility

Author

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  • Yasuoka, Masaya
  • Goto, Naohisa

Abstract

This paper presents an examination of effects of a child allowance on fertility under a pay-as-you-go pension system. In these analyses, the child allowance is financed by taxation of two kinds: an income tax and a consumption tax. Comparative static analyses show that a child allowance financed by income tax revenues can always raise fertility. Similarly with income tax, a child allowance financed by consumption tax can always raise fertility. Furthermore, our paper presents examination of optimal child allowance and transfer for older people.

Suggested Citation

  • Yasuoka, Masaya & Goto, Naohisa, 2011. "Pension and child care policies with endogenous fertility," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2478-2482.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:28:y:2011:i:6:p:2478-2482
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2011.06.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. FranÚois Bourguignon, 1999. "The cost of children: May the collective approach to household behavior help?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 503-521.
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    7. Berthold U. Wigger, 1999. "Pay-as-you-go financed public pensions in a model of endogenous growth and fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 625-640.
    8. Bas Groezen & Lex Meijdam, 2008. "Growing old and staying young: population policy in an ageing closed economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(3), pages 573-588, July.
    9. Junsen Zhang & Junxi Zhang, 1998. "Social Security, Intergenerational Transfers, and Endogenous Growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(5), pages 1225-1241, November.
    10. Tetsuo Ono, 2003. "Social security policy with public debt in an aging economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 363-387, May.
    11. Makoto Hirazawa & Akira Yakita, 2009. "Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social security," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(3), pages 565-583, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yasuoka, Masaya, 2018. "Endogenous Fertility and Pension System," MPRA Paper 86131, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Masatoshi Jinno & Masaya Yasuoka, 2016. "Are the social security benefits of pensions or child-care policies best financed by a consumption tax?," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 12(3), pages 94-112, September.
    3. Masaya Yasuoka & Naohisa Goto, 2015. "How is the child allowance to be financed? By income tax or consumption tax?," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 62(3), pages 249-269, September.
    4. Masaya Yasuoka, 2014. "Child-care Policies and Pension in an Endogenous Fertility Model," Discussion Paper Series 114, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jan 2014.
    5. Miyake, Atsushi & Yasuoka, Masaya, 2016. "Public Education and Child-Care Policies with Pay-As-You-Go Pension," MPRA Paper 75315, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Day, Creina & Guest, Ross, 2016. "Fertility and female wages: A new link via house prices," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 121-132.
    7. Masaya Yasuoka, 2013. "Can Child-Care Support Policies Halt Decreasing Fertility?," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 3(2), pages 409-419.
    8. repec:eee:joecag:v:7:y:2016:i:c:p:53-60 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child allowance; Endogenous fertility; Pay-as-you-go pension system; Taxation;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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