IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cup/jpenef/v19y2020i1p109-125_5.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Pension policies in a model with endogenous fertility

Author

Listed:
  • CIPRIANI, GIAM PIETRO
  • PASCUCCI, FRANCESCO

Abstract

We set up an overlapping-generations model with endogenous fertility to study pensions policies in an ageing economy. We show that an increasing life expectancy may not be detrimental for the economy or the pension system itself. On the other hand, conventional policy measures, such as increasing the retirement age or changing the social security contribution rate could have undesired general equilibrium effects. In particular, both policies decrease capital per worker and might have negative effects on the fertility rate, thus exacerbating population ageing.

Suggested Citation

  • Cipriani, Giam Pietro & Pascucci, Francesco, 2020. "Pension policies in a model with endogenous fertility," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 109-125, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jpenef:v:19:y:2020:i:1:p:109-125_5
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1474747218000148/type/journal_article
    File Function: link to article abstract page
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michel, Philippe & Pestieau, P, 1993. "Population Growth and Optimality: When Does Serendipity Hold?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 6(4), pages 353-362, November.
    2. Yasuoka, Masaya & Goto, Naohisa, 2011. "Pension and child care policies with endogenous fertility," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2478-2482.
    3. Lachance, Marie-Eve, 2008. "Pension reductions: can welfare be preserved by delaying retirement?," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(2), pages 157-177, July.
    4. Giam Cipriani, 2014. "Population aging and PAYG pensions in the OLG model," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 251-256, January.
    5. Luciano Fanti, 2015. "Growth, PAYG pension systems crisis and mandatory age of retirement," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(2), pages 1160-1167.
    6. Mizuno, Masakatsu & Yakita, Akira, 2013. "Elderly labor supply and fertility decisions in aging-population economies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 395-399.
    7. Firouz Gahvari, 2009. "Pensions and fertility: in search of a link," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 16(4), pages 418-442, August.
    8. Luciano Fanti & Luca Gori, 2012. "Fertility and PAYG pensions in the overlapping generations model," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 955-961, July.
    9. Menon, Martina & Pendakur, Krishna & Perali, Federico, 2012. "On the expenditure-dependence of children’s resource shares," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 739-742.
    10. Rosa Aísa & Fernando Pueyo & Marcos Sanso, 2012. "Life expectancy and labor supply of the elderly," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 545-568, January.
    11. Meier, Volker & Wrede, Matthias, 2010. "Pensions, fertility, and education," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(1), pages 75-93, January.
    12. Akira Yakita, 2001. "Uncertain lifetime, fertility and social security," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(4), pages 635-640.
    13. Cigno, Alessandro, 1993. "Intergenerational transfers without altruism : Family, market and state," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 505-518, November.
    14. Cabo, Francisco & García-González, Ana, 2014. "The Endogenous Determination Of Retirement Age And Social Security Benefits," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(1), pages 93-113, January.
    15. Luciano Fanti, 2014. "Raising the Mandatory Retirement Age and its Effect on Long-run Income and Pay-as-you-go (PAYG) Pensions," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(4), pages 619-645, November.
    16. Miyazaki, Koichi, 2014. "The effects of the raising-the-official-pension-age policy in an overlapping generations economy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(3), pages 329-332.
    17. Alders, Peter & Broer, D. Peter, 2005. "Ageing, fertility, and growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 1075-1095, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Pension Policies in a Model with Endogenous Fertility
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2018-06-19 21:01:30

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cipriani, Giam Pietro & Fioroni, Tamara, 2021. "Social Security and Endogenous Demographic Change: Child Support and Retirement Policies," IZA Discussion Papers 14018, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Cipriani, Giam Pietro & Fioroni, Tamara, 2021. "Endogenous Demographic Change, Retirement, And Social Security," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(3), pages 609-631, April.
    3. Huan Wang & Jianyuan Huang & Shuangyue Sun, 2019. "Assessment of the Financial Sustainability of China’s New Rural Pension Plan: Does the Demographic Policy Reform Matter?," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(18), pages 1-22, September.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Cipriani, Giam Pietro, 2018. "Aging, Retirement, And Pay-As-You-Go Pensions," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(5), pages 1173-1183, July.
    2. Cipriani, Giam Pietro & Fioroni, Tamara, 2021. "Social Security and Endogenous Demographic Change: Child Support and Retirement Policies," IZA Discussion Papers 14018, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Cipriani, Giam Pietro & Fioroni, Tamara, 2021. "Endogenous Demographic Change, Retirement, And Social Security," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(3), pages 609-631, April.
    4. Peter J. Stauvermann & Ronald R. Kumar, 2016. "Sustainability of A Pay-as-you-Go Pension System in A Small Open Economy with Ageing, Human Capital and Endogenous Fertility," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 2-20, February.
    5. Hirazawa, Makoto & Yakita, Akira, 2017. "Labor supply of elderly people, fertility, and economic development," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 75-96.
    6. Cremer, Helmuth & Gahvari, Firouz & Pestieau, Pierre, 2011. "Fertility, human capital accumulation, and the pension system," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1272-1279.
    7. Luciano Fanti & Luca Gori, 2014. "Endogenous fertility, endogenous lifetime and economic growth: the role of child policies," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 529-564, April.
    8. Miyazaki, Koichi, 2014. "Optimal pay-as-you-go social security when retirement is endogenous and labor productivity depreciates," MPRA Paper 61166, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Ken Tabata, 2015. "Population Aging and Growth: the Effect of PAYG Pension Reform," Discussion Paper Series 125, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jan 2015.
    10. Giam Cipriani, 2014. "Population aging and PAYG pensions in the OLG model," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 251-256, January.
    11. Yusuke Miyake & Masaya Yasuoka, 2018. "Subsidy Policy and Elderly Labor," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 4(2), pages 331-347, July.
    12. Peter J. Stauvermann & Jin Hu, 2018. "What can China Expect from an Increase of the Mandatory Retirement Age?," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 19(1), pages 229-246, May.
    13. Bandyopadhyay, Debasis & La Pere, Anatoly, 2020. "Raising productivity with pension premium," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 295-308.
    14. Peter J. Stauvermann & Frank Wernitz, 2019. "Why Child Allowances Fail to Solve the Pension Problem of Aging Societies," Economies, MDPI, vol. 7(4), pages 1-16, December.
    15. EL-HOUJJAJI, Hind & ECHAOUI, Abdellah, 2020. "Assessing the financial sustainability of parametric pension system reforms: The case of Morocco," MPRA Paper 98912, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. J. Ignacio Conde-Ruiz & Eduardo L. Giménez & Mikel Pérez-Nievas, 2010. "Millian Efficiency with Endogenous Fertility," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 154-187.
    17. Alessandro Cigno & Annalisa Luporini, 2011. "Optimal Family Policy in the Presence of Moral Hazard when the Quantity and Quality of Children are Stochastic," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(2), pages 349-364, June.
    18. Robert Fenge & Beatrice Scheubel, 2013. "Pensions and Fertility: Back to the Roots - The Introduction of Bismarck's Pension Scheme and the European Fertility Decline," CESifo Working Paper Series 4383, CESifo.
    19. Hirono, Makoto & Mino, Kazuo, 2019. "Pension, Retirement, and Growth in the Presence Heterogeneous Elderly," MPRA Paper 98096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Volker Meier & Martin Werding, 2010. "Ageing and the welfare state: securing sustainability," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 655-673, Winter.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D15 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Intertemporal Household Choice; Life Cycle Models and Saving
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cup:jpenef:v:19:y:2020:i:1:p:109-125_5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.cambridge.org/pef .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Keith Waters (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.cambridge.org/pef .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.