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Social Security and Endogenous Demographic Change: Child Support and Retirement Policies

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  • Cipriani, Giam Pietro

    (University of Verona)

  • Fioroni, Tamara

    (University of Verona)

Abstract

This paper studies retirement and child support policies in a small, open, overlapping-generations economy with PAYG social security and endogenous retirement and fertility decisions. It demonstrates that neither fertility nor retirement choices necessarily coincide with socially optimal allocation, because agents do not take into account the externalities of fertility and the elderly labor supply in the economy as a whole. It shows that governments can realize the first-best allocation by introducing a child allowance scheme and a subsidy to incentivize the labor supply of older workers. As an alternative to subsidizing the elderly labor supply, we show that the first-best allocation can also be achieved by controlling the retirement age. Finally, the model is simulated in order to study whether the policies devoted to realizing the social optimum in a market economy could be a Pareto improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • Cipriani, Giam Pietro & Fioroni, Tamara, 2021. "Social Security and Endogenous Demographic Change: Child Support and Retirement Policies," IZA Discussion Papers 14018, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp14018
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    PAYG pensions; social security; endogenous fertility; endogenous retirement;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • H2 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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