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Social security and early retirement in an overlapping-generations growth model

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  • MICHEL, Philippe
  • PESTIEAU, Pierre

Abstract

This paper explains why workers retire earlier, and earlier at the same time as society becomes more and more indebted through increasing pay-as-you-go pension liabilities. To do so, we extend the standard twooverlapping-generations growth model to allow for endogenous labor participation in the later period of life. We show that the rate of participation declines as the size of social security system increases. We also show that mandatory early retirement many be socially desirable in case of underaccumulation.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • MICHEL, Philippe & PESTIEAU, Pierre, 2013. "Social security and early retirement in an overlapping-generations growth model," CORE Discussion Papers RP 2624, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:2624
    Note: In : Annals of Economics and Finance, 14-2(B), 705-719, 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hu, Sheng Cheng, 1979. "Social Security, the Supply of Labor, and Capital Accumulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(3), pages 274-283, June.
    2. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    3. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Lawrence H. Summers, 1979. "Tax Incidence in a Life Cycle Model with Variable Labor Supply," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 93(4), pages 705-718.
    4. Boskin, Michael J, 1977. "Social Security and Retirement Decisions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(1), pages 1-25, January.
    5. Feldstein, Martin S, 1974. "Social Security, Induced Retirement, and Aggregate Capital Accumulation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 905-926, Sept./Oct.
    6. Burbidge, John B., 1983. "Social security and savings plans in overlapping-generations models," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 79-92, June.
    7. Weil, Philippe, 1987. "Love thy children : Reflections on the Barro debt neutrality theorem," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 377-391, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. David De La Croix & Géraldine Mahieu & Alexandra Rillaers, 2004. "How Should the Allocation of Resources Adjust to the Baby Bust?," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 6(4), pages 607-636, October.
    2. J. Ignacio Conde-Ruiz & Vincenzo Galasso & Paola Profeta, "undated". "The Evolution of Retirement," Working Papers 2005-03, FEDEA.
    3. Glomm, Gerhard & Jung, Juergen & Tran, Chung, 2009. "Macroeconomic implications of early retirement in the public sector: The case of Brazil," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 777-797, April.
    4. de la Croix, David & Pierrard, Olivier & Sneessens, Henri R., 2013. "Aging and pensions in general equilibrium: Labor market imperfections matter," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 104-124.
    5. Miyazaki, Koichi, 2014. "Optimal pay-as-you-go social security when retirement is endogenous and labor productivity depreciates," MPRA Paper 61166, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Vincenzo Galasso, 2012. "The Political Feasibility of Postponing Retirement," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 10(4), pages 27-31, December.
    7. J. Ignacio Conde-Ruiz & Vincenzo Galasso & Paola Profeta, 2005. "Early Retirement and Social Security: A Long Term Perspective," CESifo Working Paper Series 1571, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Zou, Tieding, 2017. "延迟退休的制约因素、政策效果与动态研究方法评价
      [Restriction, Policy Effect and Dynamic Research Method to Delay Retirement]
      ," MPRA Paper 85556, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Jan 2018.
    9. Pedro Cardoso & Bernard M.S. van Praag, 2003. "How Sustainable Are Old-age Pensions in a Shrinking Population with Endogenous Labour Supply?," CESifo Working Paper Series 861, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Anna Batyra & David de la Croix & Olivier Pierrard & Henri Sneessens, 2016. "Structural changes in the labor market and the rise of early retirement in Europe," CREA Discussion Paper Series 16-13, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    11. Alvaro Forteza & Irene Mussio, 2012. "Assessing Redistribution in the Uruguayan Social Security System," Journal of Income Distribution, Journal of Income Distribution, vol. 21(1), pages 65-87, March.
    12. Luciano Fanti, 2012. "Consequences of a boost of mandatory retirement age on long run income and PAYG pensions," Discussion Papers 2012/149, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    13. repec:ces:ifodic:v:10:y:2012:i:4:p:19074540 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Juan A. Lacomba & Francisco M. Lagos, 2009. "Reforming the retirement scheme: Flexible retirement vs. Legal retirement age," ThE Papers 09/01, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    15. Luciano Fanti, 2015. "Growth, PAYG pension systems crisis and mandatory age of retirement," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(2), pages 1160-1167.
    16. Batyra, Anna & de la Croix, David & Pierrard, Olivier & Sneessens, Henri R., 2013. "Declining bargaining power of workers and the rise of early retirement in Europe," GIAM Working Papers 13-6, Galatasaray University Economic Research Center.
    17. Cipriani, Giam Pietro, 2016. "Aging, Retirement and Pay-As-You-Go Pensions," IZA Discussion Papers 9969, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Luca Gori & Mauro Sodini, 2011. "Nonlinear Dynamics in an OLG Growth Model with Young and Old Age Labour Supply: The Role of Public Health Expenditure," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 38(3), pages 261-275, October.
    19. repec:cuf:journl:y:2018:v:19:i:1:stauvermann:hu is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Luciano Fanti, 2014. "Raising the Mandatory Retirement Age and its Effect on Long-run Income and Pay-as-you-go (PAYG) Pensions," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(4), pages 619-645, November.
    21. Alvaro Forteza, 2011. "Assessing Redistribution within Social Insurance Systems.The cases of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1311, Department of Economics - dECON.
    22. Chen, Hung-Ju, 2016. "Fertility, Retirement Age, and PAYG Pensions," MPRA Paper 69819, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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