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Social Security And Early Retirement In An Overlapping-Generations Growth Model

  • Philippe Michel

    (IUP and GREQAM)

  • Pierre Pestieau


This paper explains why workers retire earlier, and earlier at the same time as society becomes more and more indebted through increasing pay-as-you-go pension liabilities. To do so, we extend the standard twooverlapping-generations growth model to allow for endogenous labor participation in the later period of life. We show that the rate of participation declines as the size of social security system increases. We also show that mandatory early retirement many be socially desirable in case of underaccumulation.

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Article provided by Society for AEF in its journal Annals of Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 14 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (November)
Pages: 723-737

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Handle: RePEc:cuf:journl:y:2013:v:14:i:3:michel:pestieau
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  1. Weil, Philippe, 1987. "Love thy children : Reflections on the Barro debt neutrality theorem," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 377-391, May.
  2. Boskin, Michael J, 1977. "Social Security and Retirement Decisions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(1), pages 1-25, January.
  3. Kotlikoff, Laurence J & Summers, Lawrence H, 1979. "Tax Incidence in a Life Cycle Model with Variable Labor Supply," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 705-18, November.
  4. Burbidge, John B., 1983. "Social security and savings plans in overlapping-generations models," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 79-92, June.
  5. Hu, Sheng Cheng, 1979. "Social Security, the Supply of Labor, and Capital Accumulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(3), pages 274-83, June.
  6. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467.
  7. Feldstein, Martin S, 1974. "Social Security, Induced Retirement, and Aggregate Capital Accumulation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 905-26, Sept./Oct.
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